Loading…
2016FallSymposiumURCreativityEngagement has ended

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Tuesday, December 6
 

8:00am

Acknowledgements
The Undergraduate Research Program would like to give a speical thanks to everyone who assisted in the organizing and planning of the 2016 Fall Symposium.

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Extended Acknowledgements
Wilma Sherrill Center Staff, Highsmith Union Staff, UNCA Foundation

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Mission Statement
The mission of the UNC Asheville Undergraduate Research Program is to provide students with a wide variety of research, scholarly and creative opportunities that support and supplement other education activities. The Program encourages students and faculty mentors to engage in the complete active research process, including design and implementation of projects and dissemination of results.

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Program Committee Members
Mark Harvey Director Undergraduate Research Program, Mila Lemaster Program Coordinator, Undergraduate Research Program, Mary Topper Office Assistant Undergradutate Research Program, Ed Katz Associate Provost and University Dean, Office of the Provost, Aaron Dahlstrom Social Media & Communications Manager

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

UNC Asheville Foundation Inc.
For their continued support to the Undergraduate Research Program

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Subspecies Determination In Hellbenders (Cryptobranchus Alleganiensis) By The Cytb Gene
Hellbenders (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis) are large aquatic salamanders endemic to eastern North America that are currently in decline due to habitat loss. The Eastern Hellbender (Cryptobranhus alleganiensis alleganiensis) is classified as near threatened and the Ozark Hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi) is classified as endangered. Due to the phenotypic similarities of the two subspecies DNA sequencing was performed and analyzed in order to determine which species is at the Western North Carolina Nature Center. DNA was extracted from a sample of slime provided by the WNC Nature Center. For this study, we performed genetic sequencing of the Cytb gene, which was analyzed to determine if the species of hellbender at the WNC Nature Center was an Eastern Hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis alleganiensis) or the critically endangered Ozark subspecies (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi). The Cytb gene was amplified via PCR, sequenced, and compared to published hellbender sequences for subspecies determination.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:20am
038 Karpen Hall

8:00am

New Chemistry: Embracing The Human Element
In the twentieth century, chemistry’s linear profit-driven model made profound discoveries — and consequently large amounts of toxic waste and byproducts — which greatly contribute to the modern challenges humanity faces. This oversight provoked the adoption of practices and principles such as green chemistry and green engineering as a way to practice high-level chemical experimentation without acting unsustainably. With the growing integration of green chemistry and engineering in industry and academia, Paul Anastas’ talk Green Chemistry Next highlighted the lingering issue of “preventing getting stuck in a metric driven loop”. We began to seek out why this might happen, realizing the necessity to re-ask “What does it mean to be chemists, members of society, and human?"" In response to these questions, we took a humanistic approach and began to address key components needed to help students rise to the challenges in the new era of chemistry. New chemistry is intended as a guide to allow society and chemists to prosper and grow sustainably, by acknowledging the human element and finding ways to cooperate with it rather than control it. New chemistry encourages a shift away from shareholder and consumer desires as the primary driving force behind research, instead impressing ethical guidelines that assist chemists in devising their new role in society as environmental and social stewards. These guidelines help them to ultimately embrace green chemistry and engineering principles, and avoid reverting to the linear thinking which caused these problems in the first place. The introduction of curiosity as a core component of new chemistry allows for continual expansion and intellectual stimulation of the individual, leading to growth in fundamental research and subsequent applied research opportunities, and making innovative breakthroughs inevitable. These components are essential for tackling the increasingly complex problems humanity faces, such as those recently noted by George Whitesides at Harvard: public health, mega-cities, climate instability, and dissipative systems.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:20am
014 Zeis Hall

8:00am

Response To The Impacts Of Climate Change On Hawaiian Food Systems
Food production in Hawaii does not have the capacity to supply the state’s growing demand for nutrients. The discrepancy between demand and local production is so vast that Hawaii imports 92% of all the food consumed by residents and visitors of the islands. In conjunction with Hawaii’s globalized trade economy, the environmental limits on local food production generate regionally specific consequences. Oceanic transportation is a key factor influencing food prices and accessibility. The cost of transporting perishable food will increase with the global mean temperature, and supply will be disrupted by the increased frequency of extreme weather events. Climate change will not only interrupt supply chains, it will also damage agricultural and trade infrastructure. Both the private and public sector will experience rising costs associated with adapting Hawaii’s food system to the changing environment. Government spending will be necessary to renovate the state’s ten major harbors in anticipation of rising sea levels. Looking forward, the focus of the response should be to fortify infrastructure and promote local food production. Tax incentives to subsidize the production of nutritious food staples can promote the agricultural sector and local sales. Hawaiian food production will improve the state’s food resiliency and ability to respond to supply shocks. Although the cost of trade is increasing, food importation cannot be discontinued any time soon. In order to feed Hawaii’s residents, local food production must be heavily supplemented by importation. The true cost that must be considered is food accessibility for the people of Hawaii.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:20am
035 Karpen Hall

8:00am

Literacy, Disability, And Colonialism In Lee Smith’s Fair And Tender Ladies
Lee Smith, in her 1988 novel Fair and Tender Ladies, provides a seminal account of the Appalachian experience during colonial activity and addresses its impact on native Appalachian people. Appalachia has long endured a history of outsiders who attempt, in various ways, to colonize it. While operating under the guise of Progressive Era savior ideologies of “improvement” and social and cultural change, this process of colonization ultimately acts as a form of physical and cultural theft, as well as cultural erasure. For my project, I am going to investigate the ways in which Smith depicts Ivy Rowe and her disabled sister, Silvaney, as physical and figurative sites of Appalachian colonial activity. Within this framework I will read Appalachian colonialism through two primary lenses: literacy and disability. I will argue that the novel’s epistolary form not only refutes narratives of Appalachian illiteracy, but also makes readers privy to an Appalachian character’s reactions to and understandings of colonial activity that they otherwise would not know. Thus, the epistolary form enables readers to reconceptualize dominant narratives of Appalachian dependency. Moreover, I am going to evaluate the ways in which colonial forces essentially define Appalachia as disabled, according to Northern conceptions of literacy and culture, and how this designation has served to justify Appalachian colonialism.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:20am
232 Karpen Hall

8:00am

How Health Insurance Plans And Employers Are Reinventing Their Role By Incentivizing Wellness And Health Promotion
The rate of preventable disease in the U.S. is creating an epidemic of rising health care costs. Insurance plans and employers are using their unique role to help combat rising prices though incentivizing wellness and health promotion. The economic return on work-site health promotion plans is 3:1 making it favorable for employers. Through these work-site wellness programs, a consequential shift needs to occur to hold consumers accountable and focused on their health. To accomplish behavior change and change the accountability of individuals’ health the locus of motivation needs to shift internally. The first step is to hook employees though external motivation and use it as a gateway for internal motivation. Monetary value is used most often in work-site wellness programs to motivate individuals externally. Health coaching can be an effective way to help move this motivation locus of control inward. Health coaching provided by the employer or health insurer is increasing in popularity to help create long-term changes, reduce health care costs, and create a healthier America.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:20am
034 Karpen Hall

8:00am

Training-Induced Change In Aerobic Fitness And Anaerobic Power Among Female College Basketball Players
To examine training-induced changes in aerobic fitness and anaerobic power in a sample of 13 division I, female college basketball players before and after preseason. METHODS: Aerobic fitness was measured using a VO2 max test, and anaerobic power was measured using a Wingate test. Preseason training lasted one month and consisted of 8 hours per week. RESULTS: Maximal aerobic fitness significantly (p = .013) increased after preseason training. Certain aspects of anaerobic fitness such as relative peak and mean power, increased significantly (p = .025), (p < .001), respectively. Despite these positive results, individual responses varied widely. CONCLUSIONS: Preseason training can have a positive effect on aerobic endurance and anaerobic power. There were also no significant correlations between these changes in performance and age, year in school, or position played. This information may be useful for strength and conditioning coaches to design individualized training programs to maximize effects.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:20am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

8:00am

Becoming Kubrick
Stanley Kubrick has been and continues to be one of the single greatest film directors and producers in history. Kubrick’s films have captivated audiences and inspired countless other directors and producers, both young and old. Kubrick was influenced by earlier filmmakers and in turn influenced his contemporaries as well as modern movie creators. Kubrick’s inspiration and impact within the film industry has been immense and his techniques have been mirrored in many films before and since his death. This research will examine and compare his style and content to his influencers as well as his style and content in comparison to those he’s influenced by his legacy.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:20am
016 Karpen Hall

8:00am

Passing
Transgender rights have been at the forefront of the news and human rights campaigns in recent years. This documentary will provide an inside look into the world trans people are inhabiting, as well as providing insights to the transition process and the emotional and physical toll it takes on the people who undergo it. This documentary will take a look at both traditional transitions such as male-to-female and female-to-male as well as the newer concepts of gender queer transition, such as people who identify outside or all along the gender spectrum. This documentary will focus heavily on the concept of “passing”-or appearing as a different gender than your assigned-at-birth one- and the way that it affects trans peoples’ self-perception as well as the way they are perceived and treated by society.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:20am
012 Karpen Hall

8:00am

Music of Memory in the City of Refugees: Intersections of Syrian and Greek Music in Contemporary Thessaloniki.

Following the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire and the formation of a new Turkish state after the first World War, Greece received roughly a million Greek refugees from Turkey. The signing of the Lausanne Treaty in 1923 caused a further 250,000 Greeks from Turkey to be relocated to Greece as part of a compulsory population exchange facilitated between the two states. Many of these refugees were resettled in Thessaloniki and the surrounding areas of Macedonia. At present, the city once again has a refugee presence due to hostile conditions in parts of the Middle East and other areas of the world. A substantial portion of the current refugee population is Syrian. Through the use of music, both Greek and Arabic, connections between the past and present are being constructed by musicians in Thessaloniki for the purpose of deconstructing and reducing cultural and national borders and barriers between Greeks and Syrians. These connections are primarily made through use of a shared culture of music, as well as history, that specifically draws on the Greek refugee past of the 1920s.  


Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:20am
018 Lipinsky Hall

8:00am

A Search For Exoplanets - KOIs
The goal of this research was to detect multiple unconfirmed exoplanets via the transit method. An exoplanet refers any planet that orbits a star other than our own. The transit method utilizes the periodic partial eclipse of the parent star by its planet. If observations are made during the eclipse, a decrease in brightness of the parent star can be observed. Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) are potential exoplanets discovered by the Kepler Spacecraft. Once there is sufficient evidence, these objects can become confirmed exoplanets. Confirmed exoplanets discovered by the Kepler Spacecraft are given the Kepler designation, such as Kepler-438b, which is the most Earth-like exoplanet discovered to date. The Sierra Star Observatory, located in a dark region of California, was used to carry out this project. Fifteen different observations were made for ten different KOIs. Multiple CCD filters were used in order to differentiate between a false positive and an actual exoplanet. This research aims to deliver helpful data for professional astronomers working with the Kepler planets. Successfully detecting any of these KOIs will add to the ever-growing list of confirmed exoplanets. At the date of submission of this abstract, additional analysis of transit light-curves will be needed before any conclusions can be drawn.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:20am
202 Zeis Hall

8:00am

Mathematics Education Through Experiential Learning
This study investigates experiential learning in middle school math classrooms as a contributing factor to student and teacher engagement. Experiential learning is conceptualized as the use of student-directed learning, tactile manipulation, artistic projects, and movement-based activities to enhance understanding of a concept. Research was conducted through qualitative interviews with ten middle school math teachers at public, public charter, and private middle schools in Buncombe County, North Carolina. Participants were selected using a quota sampling strategy to ensure variation in schools. The analysis of the interviews examines varying definitions of experiential learning, advantages and disadvantages with the mode and student engagement factors including enjoyment, comprehension, and confidence. It also addresses teacher engagement factors including morale and student relationships. The objective of this research is to explore experiential learning as an effective educational tool in math classrooms through teachers’ observations and first hand use of the technique. Findings of the study show that student and teacher participants of experiential learning benefit from the model. Students exhibit increased engagement through enjoyment, comprehension, and confidence and teachers engage through creative lesson planning and building the necessary relationships with students to create a safe and healthy classroom experience.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:20am
237 Zageir Hall

8:00am

8:00am

Faculty Moderators
Eva Bares, Lyndi Hewitt, Susan Reiser, Don Diefenbach, Herman Holt, Erica Abrams Locklear, Evan Gurney, Brian Hook, Jason Wingert, Chris Nicolay, Jonathan King, Christine Boone, Alan Hantz, Mark West, Anne Slatton, Grant Hardy, Sarah Judson, Chris Bell, Amy Lanou, Aubri Rote, Mary Lynn Manns, Peter Kusek, Graham Reynolds, Jennifer Ward, Brian Dennison

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 5:00pm
UNC Asheville

8:20am

A Case Study of Developing and Non-Developing African Easterly Waves over the Atlantic
While it is understood that over half of all Atlantic tropical cyclones (TCs) originate from African Easterly Waves (AEWs) exiting the western African coastline, it is less understood how AEWs of similar intensity do not develop into similar intensity TCs. This case study investigates large-scale environmental influences on three different developing and non-developing AEWs that had similar intensity and amplitude as they propagated into the Atlantic. Though the parameters in each AEW were practically identical over Africa, the TCs that developed from them were very different. The first two AEWs investigated developed into Hurricane Hugo in September 1989 and Tropical Depression 14 (TD14) in September 2003, while the third AEW in 2000 did not develop into a TC at all. The results presented will highlight potential mechanisms that shed light as to why similar intensity disturbances end up having different outcomes. All of these results are based on findings using the Weather Research & Forecast (WRF) model and European Centre Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis data.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
202 Zeis Hall

8:20am

Distinguishing Louisiana Pinesnake, Pituophis Ruthveni, From Southern Pinesnake, Pituophis Melanoleucus, Using Molecular Analyses
The Louisiana pinesnake, Pituophis ruthveni, is an indigenous species of western Louisiana and eastern Texas that is morphologically similar to the Southern pinesnake, Pituophis melanoleucus. Although these species vary only slightly in skin color and patterning, geographical range and mtDNA distinguish these two species. Comparison of mtDNA sequences between snake genomes is an established method to elucidate complex phylogenetic relationships for species identification. Two species of Pituophis were collected in North Carolina by the Environmental Studies department at the University of North Carolina at Asheville, mtDNA was extracted, PCR was conducted, and resulting sequences were analyzed and compared.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
038 Karpen Hall

8:20am

QTAIM Study of Bonding in Carboranes

The bonding of boron atoms in carboranes and metalloboranes has been a subject of interest for scientists for several decades due to the number of atoms in close radial proximity of each other despite the fact that it is considered to be electron deficient possessing only three valence electrons.[1] A three-center-two-electron bond has been hypothesized to explain the boron atom’s ability to form more than three bonds within a molecule and several papers have been written supporting the existence of this bonding arrangement.[10-11] This study utilized computational chemistry techniques including the QTAIM method to obtain the electron densities, the Laplacian scalars, charge values, basin paths, Poincare-Hopf algebra, and specifically, a B3LYP DFT method with an ab initio MP2 level of theory, and a 6-311+G(2d,p) basis set to produce a geometric optimization of C2B5H7 and C2B7H9. The Trans-Ring configuration of C2B5H7 was reported as the most thermodynamically stable configuration. The ring critical point ρ(r) values of the Trans-Ring configuration of C2B5H7 and C2B7H9 were reported as lower than the corresponding bond critical point ρ(r) values to which they are attached, all of which indicate that there is not a three-center-two-electron bond present in the molecule. The charge values and Laplacian scalars results indicate fragment behavior, similar to ligand behavior, between the boron and carbon atoms and their corresponding hydrogens. The results lead to the conclusion that ligand close packing and coordination theories, along with Wade’s Rules, give better explanations for the bonding and behavior of closo-carboranes.


Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
014 Zeis Hall

8:20am

A Hybrid MEAN Web Application for Interaction Tracking and Outcomes Reporting
Useful and interesting information is central to every organization. Without effective collection, and interpretation of raw data, the useable information remains locked away. The Adult Basic Skills Education (ABSE) and English Language Attainment (ELA) programs are two important departmental programs that were in in dire need of a cohesive and effective information management system to support the activities of specialists and students at Blue Ridge Community College (BRCC). As a state-funded institution, BRCC is required to file reports with various state agencies which determine continued funding on the basis of demonstrable outcomes achieved from the various programs administered by the Department of Continuing Education. Mrs. Jennifer Jolly, Student Affairs Specialist, and co-administrator of these programs, asked for a more robust solution to be developed to replace the existing system. The ABSE Tracking and Reporting web application was developed to meet these needs.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

8:20am

Hospital Costs And Competition: An Empirical Analysis And Review
The United States healthcare economy continues to be a lightning rod for social and political reform with spiraling costs exceeding the capabilities of customers and insurers alike. Recent literature and legislation suggests that diminishing competition within the industry may be a factor in price escalation. This econometric analysis focuses on the assumption of a competitive marketplace which should exhibit conventional price behavior characteristics in variable environments of supply and demand. However, the data does not exhibit the model of either a purely competitive nor a monopolistic economy. With several possible shortcomings evident in the proposed model for analyzing hospital competition, this paper also suggests elements within the marketplace that alter its competitive chemistry into a payer-driven non-monopsony.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
035 Karpen Hall

8:20am

“Some Pride Of Place”: Analyzing Memoirist Responsibility And Place Perception Through The Lens Of Jeannette Walls’ The Glass Castle
Remaining on the New York Times bestseller list for over six years, Jeannette Walls’ memoir The Glass Castle has been read by millions across the nation and globe since its publication in 2005. Keeping this widespread popularity in mind, the memoir’s depiction of the small town of Welch, West Virginia comes to be responsible for a large majority of the public perception of Welch, a town primarily hidden from public consciousness until the publication of Walls’ book. This project provides a close reading of Walls’ language and use of detail surrounding Welch, and examines what effect her description has on forming the perception of Welch in the minds of her readers. By placing Walls’ personal experience and description of Welch within the context of the town as it existed then, and as it stands today, a pathway is then opened to explore the positive and negative effects of her decision to display the town in the way that she does, particularly to such a vast readership. Incorporating Welch’s reaction to the text, scholarship about small town identities, and a historical and contextual analysis of the representation of Appalachia in literature, this project engages in discussion around the responsibilities and agency a memoirist has when establishing public perception of place, particularly smaller, vulnerable places, and how this perception comes to negatively or positively impact town identity.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
232 Karpen Hall

8:20am

Strengthening The Roots: Strategies For Supporting Asheville’s Community Gardens
The Asheville/ Buncombe Community Garden Network is formed of almost two dozen community gardens focused on improving food resilience and availability, and community health through a neighborhood approach to agriculture. As a McCullough Fellow I partnered with Bountiful Cities, a local non-profit that oversees the Garden Network, to do research for planning the for three upcoming projects designed to address some of these challenges: a tool library, a seed library, and a volunteer management program. My research involved gathering all the necessary information that would inform the shape, scope, and direction of these projects. Part of this work involved developing a list of objectives that these programs are trying to meet and creating a program evaluation system to capture how well the projects are meeting the objectives. I will present the results of my systems research, as well as my findings relating to the challenges and needs of community gardens and what strategies are most effective in strengthening local agriculture.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
103 Rhoades Robinson Hall

8:20am

Changes In Body Composition Among Female College Basketball Players Pre- And Post-Preseason Training
To examine changes in area-specific lean mass and body fat among female, division I college basketball players before and after preseason training. METHODS: Body composition was measured pre-and-post preseason training using a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (iDXA) scan. Total and area-specific (arms, trunk, legs, android, and gynoid) lean mass and body fat were analyzed. Preseason lasted 1 month and consisted of 8 hours/week. RESULTS: Female athletes (N=11) completed this study. Total body mass increased (p = .001) after preseason from 152.8 to 155.6 lbs. Total and area-specific fat mass did not significantly change after preseason. Total lean mass increased (p = .004) from 109.6 to 112.0 lbs. However, for area-specific lean mass, only the trunk (p = .01) and android region (p = .013) significantly increased from 51.2 to 52.3 lbs. and 6.8 to 6.9 lbs., respectively. Individual lean mass responses to training varied widely. Specifically, changes in total lean mass ranged from +.02 to +7.9 lbs. Changes in total fat mass also varied widely, ranging from a loss of 2.2 lbs. to a gain of 3.5 lbs. CONCLUSIONS: Because of significant increases in total body mass and lean mass but not body fat, it is important to directly measure body composition to examine effects of training. These data demonstrate athletes’ responses to training can vary widely, thus highlighting potential uses of individualized programs.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

8:20am

Print That Leg
If a child is born without a leg, wouldn’t it be easier to go downstairs and print a new one when he hits his growth spurt, rather than having to pay tens of thousands of dollars to replace it? While our current prosthetics field is highly advanced, it’s also an important note that not all who need it can afford it. A current, non-specialized prosthetic limb can costs 60,000 dollars, not including the fitting and physical therapy. With the fast advancement from the world of 3D printing since the early 1980’s, why aren’t people looking into a more cost effective approach? In this research, we will be addressing each issue in the field of Prosthetics and how to move it towards a lower-cost 3D printing method. While people still criticize the use of 3D printing and their slower time frame, they don’t take into account the multiple types and advancements that have been booming in recent years. Is my article going to change the way we create prosthetics today? No, but it will provide knowledge to the general public of the science available today, to create cheaper prosthetics that could be accessible to anyone in need.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
034 Karpen Hall

8:20am

Chadao and Chanoyu: A Comparative Analysis of the Use of Tea Culture by Chinese and Japanese Elite Society as a Prestige Tool
The thesis of this paper is that despite the differences in traditional Chinese and Japanese tea cultures, both cultures had members of their elite society using their tea culture to enhance their own prestige. This paper will focus on the time from the mid-8th century to the early 17th century. Three aspects of tea culture will be discussed in this paper: government, religious, and material culture. The government aspect will deal with tea as used by the Chinese emperors, specifically Emperor Huizong (1100-26) who wrote a treatise on tea. For Japan, the government aspect will focus mostly on the shoguns, the military dictators of feudal Japan who used tea culture to increase their prestige through peaceful means. The religious aspect will focus completely on Buddhism, which featured prominently in East Asian tea culture. For China, the major figure that will be discussed is Ennin, a Japanese Buddhist monk who travelled through China in the 9th century and commented often on tea. Zen Buddhism played a huge role in Japanese tea culture, particularly in the person of Sen no Rikyu (1522-91) who was a devout follower of Zen and a revolutionary figure in the Japanese tea ceremony (chanoyu). Rikyu was a merchant, who would traditionally ranked very low in society, but tea culture increased his otherwise low prestige. The third aspect is material culture, particularly tea bowls, which were viewed as prestigious works of art well worth acquiring in both China and Japan to show off one’s wealth and taste.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
014 Whiteside Hall

8:20am

A Sustainable Workforce
Using Asheville and its restaurant industry as a background, this documentary will explore the effects of the city’s continuous economic growth on its working class. Whether it’s money from tourism or a growing population, the economic growth that Asheville is experiencing has allowed business owners to be able to create and sustain more jobs. Unfortunately, the majority of those jobs are low-wage labor. So, as this city is experiencing economical growth, the average cost of living is increasing and a “living-wage” has become harder to obtain for the average worker. While living conditions are becoming more luxury-based, a significant number of Asheville’s inhabitants are part of a low-income workforce. This documentary aims to explore the effects this is having on the restaurant workforce, through a variety of interviews from people involved (workers, restaurant owners, etc...).


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
012 Karpen Hall

8:20am

Portrayals Of Mental Disorders In Stanley Kubrick's Films
The portrayal of mental illness in Stanley Kubrick’s films is a theme prevalent across his body of work. From psychosis and depression, to megalomania and sociopathy, his characters suffer from a wide variety of disorders. Kubrick’s films offer an honest and intense glimpse into those struggling with mental illness, more so than many filmmakers of his time. Through study of his films alongside comparisons with the “Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition,” this study aims to psychologically analyze many of the characters in the Kubrick universe.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
016 Karpen Hall

8:20am

Aphex Twin, Blank Banshee, And The Modern Sonata Form
Sonata form has proven time and time again to be a foundational form that can be used to analyze countless classical compositions. The theory of the form certainly has stood the test of time when it comes to classical music. This form does not necessarily apply only to music of the classical genre however. The form prevails even today in modern electronic compositions. In this presentation, I will be analyzing several electronic compositions that I believe could be analyzed as having a sonata form. I will use the theory of sonata form analysis as put forward by such theorists as Hepokoski and Darcy, Caplin, and Cook. The pieces I will analyze are electronic compositions that utilize no samples, and are relatively harmonically complex. I will analyze three pieces from disparate subgenres of electronic music to show that this form applies to more than just one obscure subgenre of this field of music. Sonata form, as will be discussed, is not just a cookie-cutter mold that material must be fit in to follow a strict set of rules. For these pieces, I will not only discuss how they follow a sonata form structure, but also how this structure is used in the pieces. By the end, I will show that sonata form is used today just as much as it has been in the past, and indeed applies to much more than just the music of the past.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
018 Lipinsky Hall

8:20am

Through The Eyes Of A Foster Child: Examining The Experiences Of Foster Children Through In-Depth Narratives
The U.S. foster care system has long been a subject of interest and scrutiny for researchers and policy makers. Multiple studies have demonstrated connections between foster care and other undesirable outcomes, such as involvement in the juvenile justice system, high rates of criminality, and high rates of homelessness. It is important to pursue research that complements large-scale statistical analyses in order to uncover the complexity of experiences among children in foster care and to paint a more holistic picture of the foster care system. Further exploration of the experiences of children in foster care through personal narratives grant autonomy to the individual, which is of paramount importance for individuals who have experienced a system in which autonomy is often diminished. This study undertakes a content analysis of memoirs written by adults who have directly experienced foster care. Preliminary analyses suggest aspects of social and internal life that - though often overlooked - may be significant in the development of children. This includes the significance of peer relations when other relationships are lacking, such as parental figures. This study aims to highlight the experiences of foster children through a compassionate lens to assist in better understanding what children need in order to mitigate negative experiences while in the system and beyond.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
237 Zageir Hall

8:30am

8:40am

Ectomycorrhizal Fungi On Quercus Seedlings In The Southern Appalachian Mountains
Oaks in the southern Appalachians play an important role in forest ecology. Because of their ecological importance and the difficulty of regenerating oaks in forests, oak regeneration has been a much researched topic. Ectomycorrhizal fungi are critical to the growth and survival of oaks (Quercus spp), so understanding mycorrhizal associations could be critical to their conservation especially under the increasing threat of pests. Some fungi form symbiotic relationships with multiple host species, others form species specific relationships. The composition of fungal species on host trees is influenced by the biotic and abiotic environments. This study examined the diversity of ectomycorrhizal species on three oak seedlings harvested from the Bent Creek Experimental Forest (Buncombe County, NC). Seedlings were cultivated under different conditions affecting mycorrhizal relationships: 1) with trenching to exclude root competition and common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs) 2) in mesh bags to exclude root competition while allowing access to CMNs and 3) no treatment. Seedlings were harvested and ectomycorrhizal root tips were visually identified and removed. DNA was extracted from the root tips, amplified via PCR, and sequenced. DNA sequences were used to identify the species of fungi present on the seedlings, offering insight and knowledge regarding the identity of ectomycorrhizal symbionts on oak trees at Bent Creek.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
038 Karpen Hall

8:40am

Investigation of Pregnancy Categories and GABAA Receptor Interactions of Common General Anesthetics

This literature based research project investigates the chemical structure of three anesthetic agents and compares them to their given pregnancy category.  Pregnancy categories give the administering physician an idea as to whether the drug will affect the in-utero patient.  Sodium thiopental, a barbiturate, has been used in the medical field since 1934, and it is categorized as a pregnancy category C.  Midazolam is a benzodiazepine derivative; its use began in the 1980’s and it is classified as a category D drug.  Propofol, a category B agent, is unrelated to all other anesthetic agents, its use began in the United Kingdom and New Zealand in 1986.  The three anesthetics of interest have advantages and disadvantages, thiopental and propofol being similar.  Controversy surrounds the claim midazolam causes hypotonia also known as “floppy baby syndrome.”  The anesthetic agents of interest pharmacologically effect the gamma amino butyric acid A receptor (GABAAR), but their effects differ due to the locations of their binding sites.     This research is important because very little is understood about maternal and in-utero physiology, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of anesthetic agent within the pregnant woman and fetus, as well as the exact interactions that occur between the anesthetic and the central nervous system. 


Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
014 Zeis Hall

8:40am

Euclid’s Sandbox
Euclid’s Sandbox is a web application for college geometry students that uses user interaction and interactive graphics to help teach specific proofs from Euclidean Geometry. Educational applications, such as this project, are important because of many people’s frustration in learning mathematics. In fact, according to the American Educator, about a quarter of four-year college students have a moderate or high degree of math anxiety. Through testing this web application with ten college students I demonstrate that interactive graphics promote the students’ learning. According to McGraw Hill Education, 77% of students say that study technology has helped improve their grades. However, there are challenges to creating educational software that meets the needs of students and teachers on a broad scale, including an inability to change features and a limited lesson plan.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

8:40am

A Case Study Of Perceptions Of US Income Inequality
The goal of this project was to elicit subjects’ perceptions regarding income inequality and evaluate what factors may influence the subjects’ perception. In order to elicit this relationship, the subjects are asked to complete a demographic survey, then asked to distribute 100 pennies, either physically into a graph or numerically into a table. The subjects’ penny data is used to construct a Lorenz curve and calculate a Gini coefficient. The Gini coefficient will be compared to the actual coefficient for the United States and the deviation between the elicited and the actual Gini coefficient calculated. Finally, this deviation and the demographic data will be analyzed using multivariable regression to determine if patterns exist between demographic characteristics and perceptions of income inequality.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
035 Karpen Hall

8:40am

A Road Map To Awakening: Examining The Function Of Supporting Characters In Kate Chopin’s The Awakening
This project examines Kate Chopin’s canonical novel, The Awakening, through both a feminist and a Marxist lens. Through these two perspectives, I will focus on Edna’s path to awakening within the novel, emphasizing her points of regression and progression as a character. When analyzing Edna’s development, it is almost impossible to ignore the influence of the novel’s supporting characters, specifically, Mr. Pontellier, Adele Ratignolle, Mademoiselle Reisz, and Robert Leburn upon her awakening. I will frame my analysis of these characters through the skeleton of the gender binary structure. I will specifically examine how the reactionary and progressive characters, though dichotomies of each other, serve similar means within the novel. In this project, I claim that the supporting characters in The Awakening facilitate Edna’s developing sense of self-awareness while they simultaneously prompt her suicide by leaving her with no model to follow as an awakened woman.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
232 Karpen Hall

8:40am

Comparison Of Two Sampling Methods Used To Survey The Avian Community In Southern Appalachians Spruce-Fir Forests
The Southern Appalachian Mountains are one of the most biodiverse regions in North America and are home to many endemic species. The region’s spruce-fir forests, comprised of Fraser fir (Abies fraseri) and red spruce (Picea rubens), occur in the high elevations (> 5500 ft.) of western North Carolina, east Tennessee and southwest Virginia. These forests provide significant habitat for many bird species, but are of special concern and are threatened due to climate change, human activity, invasive insects, and air pollution. In this project, two sampling methods were performed to survey the avian community of the Plott Balsam Mountain Range in western North Carolina to compare which method best describes that community. A comparison of the resulting point count data and transect data was determined to understand how the two survey methods differ in terms of both species richness and species evenness. Line transects detected three more species than point counts. Species evenness, calculated using Simpson’s Index of Diversity, was equal between the two methods. The surveys of this project will be used as a baseline for future studies in the regions’ spruce-fir forests.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
103 Rhoades Robinson Hall

8:40am

The American Pursuit Of Happiness
What is happiness? Is it wealth, love, inner peace, or the American dream? While the answer to that may be different for everyone, the fundamental needs and wants of Americans, and mankind as a whole, can often be generalized. But what really makes us happy? Americans are often thought of as people who are always on the go and as ambitious people, but as a price for our ambition, stress and unhappiness has increased as well. In our struggle to obtain what we believe makes us happy we have done the opposite of our intentions and made ourselves unhappy. In other countries such as China and Japan the fight for happiness and success has become so brutal that the phrase, “working to death” has become an actual diagnosis. Is this our future? In our pursuit of happiness will we create a new, modern killer that rivals obesity, diabetes, or heart disease? This presentation will try to answer the question of what really makes us happy by looking at research that has been done around the world to see if we figure out what makes us happy and then how to increase that happiness by proposing programs and policies that support the behaviors that make Americans happiest. By getting to the roots of our happiness maybe Americans can avoid the behaviors that causes us unhappiness.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
034 Karpen Hall

8:40am

Too Much Sugar, Too Young? An Assessment Of Calories And Sugars In Elementary School Lunches
The rise of childhood obesity in the United States of America (USA) is of concern. In North Carolina, 1 in 3 children are considered obese (above the 85th percentile body mass index for age). Overconsumption of calories and sugar increases one's risk of being overweight, type 2 diabetes, and other health problems. Providing meals to students enrolled in public schools may contribute to a nutritious diet for students. The current National School Lunch Program (NSLP) meal standards were updated for the first time in 25 years in 2012, in order to better suit children's nutritional needs. Currently, 31.6 million students are enrolled in the NSLP in the USA. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommends a limit of 25% of calories from added sugars, and that K-5th grade students consume between 350 and 500 calories at lunch daily. This study examines the nutritional content of lunch choices made by elementary school-aged students at one public elementary school in Buncombe County, North Carolina. This study emerged out of a concern regarding caloric and sugars intake by elementary school-aged students. The study compares the caloric and sugar content of meals selected by students who chose a la carte items in addition to their meals with students who did not select such items. This study found that on average students consume an appropriate amount of calories at lunch, however students’ lunches contained, on average, more sugars than is recommended. The main source of sugars in the lunches were a la carte items that students are able to purchase for an additional charge. While it is important to provide students enrolled in the public education systems meals, what students choose and consume may not support optimal student health.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

8:40am

Wilderness Policy From 1964-1984: The Rise And Fall Of Wilderness In Western North Carolina
In the early 20th century a burgeoning awareness regarding the intrinsic value of America’s last remaining wilderness areas began to take shape, and by 1964 the landmark legislation of The Wilderness Act was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson. In Western North Carolina it provided for the formation of six wilderness areas which were designated over the next twenty years. Several legislative acts helped to strengthen these designations, including The Eastern Wilderness Areas Act of 1975. With the passage of the Wilderness Act of 1964 came heavy opposition both locally and regionally in Western North Carolina. Timber companies, railroads, locals utilizing these areas for their economic survival, and many others were affected by the Wilderness Act of 1964. Only in the last few decades has scholarship begun to emerge regarding the significant impact the Wilderness Act had on the people, the economy, and the land of Western North Carolina, along with the continued impact it still has today. This thesis paper draws on an analysis of newspaper articles, legislation, interviews, and primary and secondary source works to argue that the future of wilderness areas in Western North Carolina remains precarious due to the continued varied interpretations of both the Wilderness Act and The Eastern Wilderness Areas Act rhetoric, the “commons” mentality of viewing these wilderness areas as semipublic places for local utilization, the subsequent extractive culture still practiced by many in Western North Carolina, and the resistance to having these wilderness areas adjoin private lands.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
014 Whiteside Hall

8:40am

Adult
“Adult” is an observational documentary on the hectic and stressful lives of college students. It takes an in-depth look into the college experience of four students. Using these student's experiences, this documentary tries to come up with the answer to the questions: Are college students really too stressed and busy? And why are they so stressed and busy? The appeal of this topic comes from its relevance.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
012 Karpen Hall

8:40am

Sex, Love, And Aggression Portrayed By Kubrick
Stanley Kubrick explores several different themes across his movies. The themes of sex, love, and aggression are components that he incorporates within almost all of his films. This research compares Kubrick’s use of sex, love, and aggression in seven of his films and explores how each theme is used to appeal to his audience’s desires of human nature, and how Kubrick’s themes make them aware of the dangers of combining these three themes.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
016 Karpen Hall

8:40am

A Survey Of Results Concerning Properties Of Independence Polynomials
We present a survey of approaches concerning the independence polynomial of a variety of graphs. A graph G is a collection of vertices V and edges E, which may be represented as points in space and line segments connecting these points.The independence polynomial relays important combinatorial information concerning the graph. We consider various properties such a polynomial may or may not have including symmetry, unimodality and log-concavity. Specifically we focus on almost 3-regular trees and a path like tree whose independence polynomials can be computed with recurrence relations. We work on measuring the log-concavity and unimodality of these polynomials. Also, given certain conditions on two arbitrary log-concave polynomials we determine that their sum can be at worst bimodal.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
202 Zeis Hall

8:40am

Reinterpretation Of A Classical Form
Tchaikovsky’s fourth symphony is an extraordinary example of the classical application of the sonata form. I will explain how the abnormally prolonged exposition section is foreshadowed by the immediate presence of phrase extension and loosening techniques beginning with the initial introduction of the first theme. I will compare the composition to standard compositional techniques as explained by music theorist William Caplin. The movement structurally adheres to 3 part sonata form but, deviates with unpredictable tonal centers. The primary theme modulates to a remote area, not the dominant as expected. As is typical for sonatas, the memorable ‘fate’ theme is brought back a number of times during different sections of the movement, voiced by different instruments. Tchaikovsky’s symphonic voicing allows for the restatement of phrases in such a way that new interpretations can be made. Analysts and commentators have gathered information from the composer’s life during the composition of the fourth that give context to the dramatic work.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
018 Lipinsky Hall

8:40am

A Look Inside: Examining The Perspectives Of Mental Health Professionals
Mental health and the study of mental illness continues to be of vital importance in today’s society, as many people struggle with mental health that affects their daily lives. While previous studies investigating mental illness have focused primarily on the individuals who struggle with mental illness, less is known about the experiences of direct care professionals who aid clients in their therapeutic journey. This study specifically examines the perspectives of staff working with teens in a residential treatment facility in Western North Carolina. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten direct care staff in the fall of 2016. Preliminary analyses reveal both challenging and fulfilling aspects of the work, as well as varied effects on the personal lives of direct care professionals.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
237 Zageir Hall

9:00am

Effect Of Testosterone, 5-Dihydrotestosterone, Mouse Growth Hormone, And Thyroxine On Major Urinary Protein (MUP) Expression In Female Murine Hepatocyte Cell Line Hepa1-6
Many organisms use chemicals such as pheromones to carry out interspecies communication. In mice, the Major Urinary Proteins (MUPs) serve as pheromones informing many behaviors, including aggression, mate attraction and territory marking. Out of the 21 possible MUP sequences within the mouse genome, only a subset of these proteins is expressed, allowing each individual to produce its own identifiable signature of expressed proteins in detectable concentrations. However, the mechanisms governing which MUPs are expressed by an individual remains unknown. This study aims to explore the mechanisms driving gene expression of the 21 MUP genes. By treating the cultured female murine hepatocyte cell line Hepa1-6 with testosterone, 5-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), mouse growth hormone (mGH), and thyroxine (T4), MUP expression can be induced in a culture dish, allowing us to simulate the natural production of proteins. After inducing MUP expression through hormone treatments, expressed MUPs can be identified through sequencing, and additional tests such as western blot analyses and comparative analyses of epigenetic modifications between expressed and unexpressed proteins can be done to show the stage of translation or transcription at which MUP expression and gene choice are being regulated. These results will demonstrate the genetic mechanisms dictating identity and social interaction between mice, providing broader insight into gene expression as a whole.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:20am
038 Karpen Hall

9:00am

Brain Camp
Brain Camp is an online resource for web developers and designers, similar to Codeacademy, Khan Academy, and W3Schools. It provides a range of web authoring information, including quizzes, examples, and articles. Brain Camp is a one page web application utilizing AngularJS for front-end modular views with PHP and MySQL to create a user login, comment thread, and a user profile in which to track user progress. Brain Camp utilizes Bootstrap to provide a responsive interface. The site was tested by Computer Science and New Media majors. Brain Camp’s users determine the site’s direction -- what do the users want to be taught and tested in the lessons and quizzes? Their input dictates the future of Brain Camp.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:20am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:00am

An Econometric Analysis Of The United States’ Trade Embargo On Cuba: Projections And Implications Using The Gravity Model
The Gravity Model is an econometric model designed to predict the expectation of trade flows between trade partners based on the size of their respective economies and the geographic distance between them. This paper seeks to determine what the economies of the United States and Cuba, specifically in terms of trade imbalance, US imports, and US exports, would look like if the United States lifted the embargo and what growth may be expected if and when the embargo is ends.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:20am
035 Karpen Hall

9:00am

Corps Morcelé: Spectacular Anatomy, Anatomy Theatres, And The Fragmented Body In John Donne’s “The Ecstasy,” And “A Valediction Of My Name In The Window”
Recently scholars have shown how John Donne’s poetry was influenced and energized by the discourse of anatomy in seventeenth century-England, which provided the poet with a theoretical framework to engage the relationship between the physical body and its intermingled soul. This project participates in this larger trend by investigating Donne’s anatomical focus in “The Ecstasy,” and “A Valediction of My Name in The Window,” two poems that have not been sufficiently examined in these terms. This project will discuss the uses and implications of anatomy in the period, paying specific attention to the role of anatomy theatres in early modern medicine and their spectacle of the body’s fragmentation. Reading Donne’s poetry through the lens of early modern English medicine reveals the subtle relations between physical and intangible phenomena in his work, as well as his didactic method of explaining erotic, sexual, and physical death in relation to the universe.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:20am
232 Karpen Hall

9:00am

Investigating Best Practices To Develop A Curriculum For Community Resilience And Food Security
Many counties of Western North Carolina have high levels of food insecurity. One way to address this issue is to provide communities with the tools and training to grow and prepare their own food. Often by implementing systems to address food needs, other positive impacts can emerge, such as helping individuals alleviate depression and encouraging community resiliency. Through a partnership with the non-profit organization Groundswell International, a twelve lesson curriculum was developed and tested over the summer of 2016 as a component of the “Grow Food Where People Live” initiative. This took place in Polk County, North Carolina, at a section 8 housing development known as Ashley Meadows. This project attempted to address possible solutions to food insecurity in Western North Carolina, with a final product that can be applied to any community struggling with food security and community resiliency. The research involved investigating existing models of successful community agriculture projects, as well as using formative and summative evaluation methods to understand what the participants were gaining from the program and how it could be improved. Evaluations were conducted in the form of weekly class assessments, as well as a pre- and post- survey prior to beginning the course and after completion. Several challenges were faced during the project. Participants expressed frustration at circumstances out of their control, for example constraints enforced by the Section 8 housing rules, poor soil, and unbearable Polk County heat. Additional participation incentives may be needed in the future, as well as long-term curriculum evaluation.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:20am
103 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:00am

Barriers To Community Engagement In Government Programming
The purpose of this research is to assess the barriers various communities face when attempting to participate in services purposed to address individual and community need. The communities represented in this research are minority groups, homeless populations, victims of substance abuse, individuals with mental illness, and citizens infected with HIV. Many of the studies reviewed in this research are unique in that the communities being studied are also the respondents to survey questions. This allows the research to accurately reflect perceived needs and barriers faced by communities; therefore lending itself to possible solutions. Barriers to access vary widely depending on population type and unmet need. Several barriers were present in every article related to social determinants of health and societal disparities present in today’s society. Issues such as stigma, racism, exclusion, and societal pressures are consistent barriers that threaten the psychological, emotional, physical and financial wellness of communities in need. The literature states that respondents feel that community programs are not meeting the needs of their “at risk” populations and may even play a role in the continued suppression of already underserved communities. Understanding what barriers exist allow community members, community programmers, and policy makers to alter the structure of programs in order to make access to services easier for those in need. This research is the first step to giving voice to underserved communities in hopes that community programs will be customized to the needs of specific communities, giving all citizens the chance to attain upward mobility.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:20am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

9:00am

The Aging Spine: Classical Pilates as an Intervention Method
Chronic neck, shoulder and back pain are one of the most commonly encountered complaints in the medical field. This chronic pain stems from a plethora of physiological, environmental and external factors. Some of these variables are preventable, such as obesity or poor posture, however, some are inevitable, such as age and birth abnormalities. In my research, I will look at three specific groups, young adults, women during childbearing years, and geriatrics. I will be examining the most common risk factors associated with back and neck pain, within these specific populations. Some examples include, technology or “tech neck”, weight gain during pregnancy, and osteoporosis. As we age and cross many different milestones, our spine ages and crosses milestones along with us. It is important to find a convenient and successful modality, which is easy to incorporate into our daily lives, in order to allow ourselves to age healthy and gracefully, from the inside out. I am proposing a classical Pilates exercise routine, as an intervention method for all three specific populations. Classical Pilates can be conducive to any age, body type, or physical ability. Pilates as a lifestyle choice not only promotes healthy aging of the spine, but is also an effective treatment for all chronic back and neck pain.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:20am
034 Karpen Hall

9:00am

The Game Of United States Diplomacy Within The Ottoman Empire: How United States’ Interests In The Ottoman Empire Delayed Its Entrance Into The Great War.
At the outbreak of World War I, the Ottoman Empire expanded its diplomatic ties with many world powers, in hopes of remaining the gateway to the Middle East. The empire remained a target for land acquisition by Britain, France, and Russia through their expansion of imperialist interests. The United States at this time was a budding superpower that established a diplomatic tie with the Ottomans through Henry Morgenthau, the United States diplomat to Constantinople. The United States attempted to use its neutrality and diplomacy to keep the Ottoman Empire out of the Great War, prolonging the eventual Ottoman entry into World War I. The United States created a unique bond with the Ottoman Empire due to its lack of interest in Ottoman lands, but with more of an interest in building an economic, social, and political relationship. Scholars have overlooked the history of the United States’ interests within the Ottoman Empire during the few months leading up to the Great War. This lack of scholarship suggests that scholars do not view the United States’ interests as a story that should be told. However, it is this history that is important because it represents the beginning stages of the United States becoming a global superpower. Using the primary sources from the United States’ National Archives, I hope to discuss the untold history of American interests within the Ottoman Empire.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:20am
014 Whiteside Hall

9:00am

A Message For The Wanderers
A documentary short film about the difficulty in deciding on a major in college and how following one's passion is worth the work. The film focuses on two underclassmen: Dalvin Kang, a Music Technology major, and Alex Nikas, a Studio Art major, who've decided to pursue their passion as a career. Also included are various perspectives from undecided students and an established professor who has been working within their passion for years. The film will take a participatory approach where the filmmaker will provide a final perspective in order to emphasize the film's message for undecided students to pick a major that aligns with their interests in order to live a more fulfilling life.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:20am
012 Karpen Hall

9:00am

From Feral To Familial: Anthropomorphism And The Feminine Form In Stanley Kubrick's Films
An exploration of gender dynamics and dualities of women and animals in Kubrick’s films, separately and together, reveals how each evokes vulnerability, emotional displays, and varying aspects of human nature in male characters. Women and animals act both as the hand of fate and as victims of fate in Kubrick's films. When animals do so, they can only be innocent, but when women change the tides, they are villainized. Men in Kubrick’s films seem to either embody or be held to hegemonic masculine standards, and are punished, killed, or otherwise meet ill fates if they deviate. Male characters’ softer sides appear when interacting with animals or women. Animals represent the ideal binary-masculine form, since in the wild they operate from basic instincts of eating, sleeping, fighting, and sex. Animals represent the ideal binary-feminine form when kept as pets, who depend on human (i.e. male) protection for survival. The same wild-animal protective nature that compels men to keep pets, compels them also to domestically guard women. Men guard themselves against women, who are never as innocent as animals, due to the gender-neutral human-nature traits of manipulation and suspicion. Kubrick utilizes these tropes to purposefully raise awareness of social issues through provoking discomfort, rather than displaying them gratuitously.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:20am
016 Karpen Hall

9:00am

The Hidden Usage Of Sonata Form In The First Movement Of Stravinsky’s Petrushka: The Shrovetide Fair
Sonata form is a common musical form that developed in the Classical period of music history and continues to stand as one of the most influential forms recognized in the musical community today. I want to take this form and apply it to a piece that seemingly does not follow this form to the inexperienced eye, but in actuality does. In this paper I will uncover the unlikely possibility of the twentieth century composer, Igor Stravinsky, using sonata form in one of his most renowned ballets. Igor Stravinsky is famous for the works Firebird Suite (re-popularized by Fantasia 2000) and Rite of Spring (a ballet that caused riots due to its unusual rhythms and chords), but his typically forgotten ballet is Petrushka, written in 1910. Petrushka is divided into four movements and I will analyze the first, The Shrovetide Fair, and use a well-known Haydn symphony as a basis for my comparisons to sonata form. I find this movement fascinating in the fact it seems to be organized chaos. The Shrovetide Fair is a movement full of various polyrhythms and random time signature changes that would seem to represent the chaotic nature of a festival in 1800s Russia. I will peel through this chaos and explain the underlying organization into sonata form using music theorist William E. Caplin’s sonata analysis techniques, because there are clear divisions of sections that prove there is an organizational pattern that Stravinsky did not make obvious.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:20am
018 Lipinsky Hall

9:00am

How They Hate: An Investigation Of Hate Websites From The American South
Previous research on the topic of online hate groups has indicated that these groups use techniques to consolidate their identity as well as perpetuate further instances of hate. Earlier studies have analyzed data from Hatewatch, affiliated with the Southern Poverty Law Center in which researchers conducted content analyses on hate sites in order to answer questions such as how members of groups participate and interact within the framework of the hate groups, and also to describe the groups in terms of whether or not they were violent. In order to discover how hate is justified and perpetuated, this study takes a similar approach to examine hate websites from five southern states along the Eastern Coast: Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. The investigation involves a content analysis of hate web sites from the previously mentioned states. Variables of interest include: to what degree the websites promote hate; the targets of their hate; and how the websites perpetuate instances of hate. Ultimately, this analysis explores how and why hateful speech and acts may be perpetrated online.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:20am
237 Zageir Hall

9:00am

Isolation and characterization of antibiotic compounds produced by Gram-Negative bacteria strains Pseudomo nas and C hromobacterium
Multidrug resistant bacterial infections, which arise due to misuse and overuse of antibiotics, are responsible for many nosocomial infections and are a threat to human health. Derivatization of known antibiotic compounds via total or semisynthesis can be time consuming and ineffective at targeting specific bacteria. This investigation focuses on bacteria found in the phytotelmata of Sarracenia pitcher plants and the natural antibiotic compounds they secrete under varying conditions The aim of the project is to find single-producer and co-culture producing bacteria that secrete secondary metabolites effective a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and -negative pathogens. A Pseudomonas (CMCP E3) and Chromobacterium (CP2 SSIV)isolated in this study have been found to be effective against Gram-positive bacteria Sta phylococcus aureus and the fungi Fusarium solani. The bacteria strains were cultured in minimal media containing either succinate or citrate that showed the densest growth after 72 hours. A 6 L citrate culture of the CMCP E3 bacterium yielded on average 32 mg of crude product and 9 mg of antibacterial compound. Optimization of large scale culture of CP2 SSIV and characterization of the antibacterial secondary metabolite produced by CMCP E3 using NMR and mass spectrometry are ongoing.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:40am
014 Zeis Hall

9:20am

Identification Of Gray Wolf (Canis Lupus) Pup’s Ancestral Geographic Origin Using Mitochondrial DNA
The gray wolf species (Canis lupus) has been divided into two classifications, New World subspecies (C. lupus lycaon) and Old World subspecies (C. lupus). The New World subspecies, otherwise known as the Eastern Wolf, is listed on the endangered species list, and was thought to have evolved from hybridization between gray wolves (C. lupus) and red wolves (C. rufus). Further examination showing that the pup’s grandparents were also of New World decent would call for increased protection of the pups. This cannot be identified phenotypically though, and thus DNA sequencing analysis must be utilized. Mitochondrial DNA was extracted from blood samples provided by the WNC Nature Center and the D-loop (control region) was amplified and then sequenced. DNA sequences were compared to other published sequences to determine the ancestral lineage of the wolves.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:20am - 9:40am
038 Karpen Hall

9:20am

Breaking Containment: Rewriting Old Code Using Modern Frameworks
SCP: Containment Breach, one of PC Gamer’s top 50 free PC games, is an indie game that jumpstarted a lot of famous YouTuber’s “let’s play” careers back when it was released in 2012. However, because the game was built in an old engine, it has not been easy for the original developer or modders to scale up. This project, therefore, consists of porting the levels, entities, and gameplay of SCP: Containment Breach from its old engine (Blitz3D) to Unity: a modern, scalable, and easily modifiable game engine. In contrast to the old, unwieldy codebase, the remake utilizes many of the methodologies and architecture choices of modern software engineering in order to create an error-free and exciting user experience. The levels, events, enemy encounters, and stories are randomized each time a new game is started, to allow players to have unique experiences during every game. Thus, the code must be able to handle many different game state combinations. The development software includes Unity, Visual Studio 2015, Blender, and 3D World Studio. Test users and stakeholders are the members of the SCP: Containment Breach community, including the original creator and team of developers who continue to develop for the Blitz3d version written in BlitzBasic.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:20am - 9:40am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:20am

A Fundamental Analysis Of The Sherwin Williams Company
This project asks the question, Is Sherwin Williams stock a good buy? This project uses fundamental analysis to answer to answer this question. Fundamental analysis forecasts future cash flows and future discount rates in order to calculate what is called the firm's intrinsic value. The intrinsic value of a firm is the present value of the firm’s anticipates future cash flows. If the current price per share is below the current intrinsic value, an investor can profit from buying the company's stock. This project uses economic, industry, and company analysis to calculate Sherwin Williams intrinsic value, and make a decision to buy or to sell.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:20am - 9:40am
035 Karpen Hall

9:20am

The Religious Appropriation Of The Dragon In Beowulf
This project analyzes the Christian and pagan symbolism of the unnamed dragon featured in the last few scenes of the Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf. Despite the immense amount of scholarship focused on the Grendel-kin, the most infamous creatures within the poem, the dragon is only peripherally considered – disregarded as an archetypal representation of the fire-breathing dragon to which the modern West has become accustomed. The few scholars who have attempted to bring the dragon into the academic conversation have done so with limited perspectives and analyses, and have subsequently pigeonholed the dragon as either a pagan symbol or a Christian symbol. Why can't the dragon be both? In pursuing the origins and the symbolism of Beowulf’s dragon, it becomes clear that the dragon is not solely one or the other, but instead, is a masterful blending of the two cultures, and evidence of the Christian appropriation of pagan motifs to encourage the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:20am - 9:40am
232 Karpen Hall

9:20am

Handedness and Mental Disorders
To this day, researchers do not know the exact cause of handedness in humans. Studies have attempted to delve deeper into: what influences handedness, the degree in which different factors influence handedness, and correlations between handedness and health. Recently, research studying the link between handedness and mental disorders has become a more pronounced scientific query. Research to date has found some interesting correlations between the two, and may potentially prove handedness as a risk factor for certain mental disorders. However, some results are inconclusive and conflict with one another. Additional data is needed to draw further conclusion regarding the etiology of handedness and its correlation with mental disorders, especially before the causation between these links can be determined. Understanding this correlation is pertinent to those affected by mental disorders, as it helps advance treatments and paves a way towards eventually curing mental disorders. By deciphering this correlation we may glean important information about humans, how we function, and how the great mystery of the mind works.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:20am - 9:40am
034 Karpen Hall

9:20am

“Do It For Your Grandchildren” A Missed Opportunity: The Legacy Of The NCJAR And JACL Divide
The Japanese Reparations Movement also known as the Redress Movement, sought to gain reparations for the relocation and internment of 110,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. These civilians were detained without trial and by executive order. Starting in 1979 with the formation of a research commission, and ending in 1988 with the signing of the Civil Liberties Act, internment was brought into the public eye and reparations were granted. Internment however was never officially and explicitly put on trial in front of the supreme court. The Japanese American Citizens League, and the newly founded, National Council for Japanese American Redress disagreed on what form Redress should take, the JACL pursuing the successful congressional pathway, and the NCJAR pursuing a lawsuit against the Government of the United States. By studying the Washington and Seattle transcripts of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians, the JACL newspaper, and the NCJAR newsletter, as well as other documents of communication between these two groups, this paper seeks to examine the dynamics of the split and the Redress movement as a whole, while showing that both sides knew there was a legal loophole left open by not putting internment on trial, but that a disagreement as to the necessity of patching that loophole led to the failed lawsuit.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:20am - 9:40am
014 Whiteside Hall

9:20am

Believe Me
This documentary, Believe Me, will provide the audience with an in-depth look into the topic of sexual assault at UNCA. Anne Slatton is teaching a documentary filmmaking class this semester in the mass communications department and assigned each student to make a documentary about any topic they wish. With the help of 2 other classmates, Gordon Gellatly and Austin Sloan, this film follows the stories of several survivors of sexual assault on this campus, as well as interviews with the president of one of the fraternities on campus, a previous athlete, Chief Boyce, a counselor at the health services center, an OurVOICE employee and Keishea Boyd, assistant Title IX coordinator. The purpose of this film is to provide a wide range of angles about the topic while avoiding as much anger, finger-pointing and bias as possible. I believe the point of a documentary is to provide the audience with all the facts, and allow them to come up with their own conclusions. We hope this film gets people talking about the issue of sexual assault so we can start changing the rape culture surrounding us, especially on college campuses.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:20am - 9:40am
012 Karpen Hall

9:20am

The Realities Of Kubrick's “A Clockwork Orange”
Stanley Kubrick's “A Clockwork Orange” has caused a significant amount of controversy, due to its unsettling and graphic scenes. What many people do not realize is that the actions in the film are mirrors of cases found in real life. This research explores the truths of “A Clockwork Orange”, and parallels the movie with real events from the time period. Some topics covered in the research are the mistreatment of the mentally ill, abuse of power in different settings, political manipulation, and certain acts of violence.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:20am - 9:40am
016 Karpen Hall

9:20am

Games of Silence and Surprise: Comedy in the Symphonies of Haydn
The use of compositional techniques to imbue music with comedic elements was not atypical in the common practice era, but recognizing the jokes that were being told requires careful scrutiny due to the temporal and cultural divide that separates modern listeners from the experience of the great composers. In particular, Joseph Haydn made elaborate use of techniques such as comedic text, deviation from convention, musical parody, incongruency, and titling to emphasize humorous aspects of musical storytelling. The effects of these techniques on the trained listener are many, but frequently focus on a betrayal of conventional expectation with the express purpose of making light of the tradition and practices, or making referential jokes that could be readily understood in the era.
The salience of these jokes has diminished with age, but is still ripe for appreciation if a listener knows when and how to hear them. One must inculcate oneself into the conventional styling and techniques of the associated era of a piece if they are to hear it as it was meant to be heard at the time of its conception. Using Leonard B. Meyer’s implicational theory along with Enrique Alberto Arias’ hierarchy of comedic techniques in tonal music, this paper will explore the comedic nuances present in Haydn’s Symphony No. 80 in D Minor, and comment on the effect of these techniques on modern listeners in comparison to listeners contemporaneous to the composer.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:20am - 9:40am
018 Lipinsky Hall

9:20am

The Effects of Soundscapes on Moood
The majority of prior research concerning the effects of a natural environment on an individual’s mood has primarily examined the use of visual stimuli as a means of improving one’s mood and, consequently, cognitive performance. For example, previous research has found that students in residences with natural scene through a window exhibited significantly greater well-being than students without natural scenes. In addition, students with visual access to the natural environment via a window have been found to perform better academically than those without such access. Similar research in an urban setting found that girls with access to natural views from their homes performed better academically than girls with no natural views from their homes. Moreover, the latter group showed weakened impulse control and ability to concentrate. Compared to the large number of studies on mood on cognitive restoration, little research has examined the effects of natural sounds on mood and other cognitive states (e.g., attention). Previous research on natural and anthropogenic sounds and their effects on mood restoration found that the overall moods of participants in natural soundscapes was generally superior compared to the groups exposed to anthropogenic sounds or no sounds at all. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that naturalistic-auditory stimuli will have a positive effect on an individual’s overall mood-state when compared to anthropogenic-auditory stimuli. In addition, this study was designed to determine whether a ‘voice’ nature sound (i.e., birdsong) is better than a non-voice (rainfall, gentle breeze) nature sound in terms of promoting positive mood. Finally, it is hypothesized that individuals who are exposed to auditory stimuli that is comprised of anthropogenic or “man-made” sounds will exhibit negative mood-levels after that trial. The results will be discussed in the context of theory and research on the effects of exposure to nature on wellness.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:20am - 9:40am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

9:20am

The Power Of A Hashtag: Twitter As A Political Tool Against Oppressive Regimes
Over the last ten years, the microblogging platform Twitter has taken mainstream media by storm, allowing users to publish updates to the globe via internet or phone. Tweets are often trite and mundane, but they have the capability to define, make, and break the news. This can happen in regions that are ruled by oppressive regimes. Living under an oppressive regime often means information is biased and/or difficult to disperse. With online tools such as Twitter, which can bypass internet restrictions via speech to text options through phone calls, activists’ voices can be heard. This research analyzes the role of Twitter as a political tool during recent waves of resistance against oppressive regimes in Egypt, Tunisia, China, Turkey and Iran. By using content analysis of tweets relating to certain hashtags of political movements within these regions, this research will discuss the effectiveness of Twitter as a political tool against oppressive regimes. The result is that people who may feel helpless under the oppressive ruling of a regime now have an outlet that can inspire hope, change, and revolution.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:20am - 9:40am
237 Zageir Hall

9:40am

Microinvertebrate Communities Inhabiting Sarracinia Spp. Colonies In Various Habitats In Western North Carolina: Species Composition And Community Development Over Time.
Sarracinia (pitcher plant) spp. provide unique spatial niches to several families of microinvertebrates and macroinvertebrates in adult and larval forms. Digestive enzymes diluted by rainfall allow for these habitats to thrive virtually free of predation. Little is known about the invertebrate composition inside pitchers, and how they develop over time during the Sarracinia spp. growing period. For three months, 8 Sarracinia spp. populations in Haywood, Buncombe and Graham county in western North Carolina were surveyed for pitcher fluid volume and invertebrate composition to provide comparative data to reveal changes over 30 day periods. Microinvertebrates populations (n) and species composition were systematically estimated from 200-600 microliter water samples from each pitcher. Data comparing three month old pitcher with four month old pitchers will reveal differences in age of microhabitat and the type and number of organisms present. Data comparing width of pitcher opening with invertebrate surveys will reveal how size of habitat will affect population numbers and diversity. Older pitchers will presumably have a higher number of microinvertebrates, and a more diverse community composition. Pitchers with a large mouth diameter will experience the same positive correlation in invertebrate count and diversity.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:40am - 10:00am
038 Karpen Hall

9:40am

BlinkMap
BlinkMap is an application written in Java for Android smartphones that mitigates navigational multitasking. It does this by syncing the smartphone with an Arduino device via Bluetooth and signaling the user when to turn by reading navigation data from Google Maps. By silently prompting the user using left and right LED lights, BlinkMap allows the smartphone to be used for phone calls while driving, or to simply be put away. The tools used to develop and test this application were a Nexus 6P Android smartphone, Android Studio, the Adafruit Feather 32u4 Bluefruit LE Arduino and the Arduino IDE.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:40am - 10:00am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:40am

Industrial Hemp: Economic Challenges And Opportunities For The United States
Industrial hemp is used for rope, carpet, brake linings, automotive body parts, shoes, fabrics, paper, cardboard, cement, wallboard, fuel, lubricants, soap, shampoo, cosmetics, food products, and many many other consumer products in the U.S.; however, most of these are made from imported hemp due to the fact that industrial hemp is illegal to produce according to federal law. Section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 allows for state by state pilot research proposals; many states have since enacted laws to establish hemp production and research programs in various forms. The resulting emerging market for industrial hemp is quickly evolving and unique. There are few products that state legislation allows for while remaining illegal at a federal level. This project examines the emerging hemp market in the United States. Particular attention is given to the nature of the markets for the various final products and uses for industrial hemp, the number of buyers and sellers, the presence or absence of barriers to entry, pricing, and state and federal policies the influence the market. The uncertainty presented by the federal-state policy disconnect creates significant barriers to the expansion of industrial hemp production in the United States.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:40am - 10:00am
035 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Reserve And Erasure: Don DeLillo's Millennium Shift
Don DeLillo’s work has zigzagged through the rigor of both critical praise and emphatic rejection. Perhaps his most popular novel, Underworld put a final seal on his 20th century work, giving way to what has been a murkier and more poorly generalized conception of his 21st century writing. This project will examine Zero K, DeLillo’s most recent novel, in conversation with Underworld as a means of defining the 21st century shift which DeLillo has taken. Thematically, structurally, and aesthetically, Underworld is a novel of total and fastidious cultural accumulation. Zero K functions as a purging of this accumulation, and ultimately defines DeLillo’s post-9/11 minimalism. Through the incorporation and acknowledgment of Cold War-era history as well as particles of information teased out from DeLillo’s own 21st century experience, an inverse narrative is woven that reflects both the writer and the cultural space he occupies.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:40am - 10:00am
232 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Mental Health and Gun Violence
Many individuals that have a diagnosed mental illness are not violent by nature. Even those that haven’t been diagnosed have very few lapses in which they are aggressive. Those who commit unspeakable acts of violence are on the forefront of mental illness and how mental illness connects to guns is a problem with no solution. Many feel that the solution is gun control. The ideal situation would be, someone with mental illness, is prevented to acquire a hand gun or semi-automatic rifle and psychiatric diagnosis predict gun violence. However, there are cases where the lack of gun control has prevented a mass shooting and psychiatric diagnosis can prevent suitable people to lawfully purchase and carry a handgun. Support for mental healthcare has inadequately funded and developed health practices, allowing some people are misdiagnosed or “band aid” the problem with medication. Misdiagnosis and inadequate treatment can have adverse side effects and the outcome can be violent events that we hear about in the news. Developing a solution for violence will require funding for mental health programs so individuals can address their issues without feeling the stigma or embarrassment of seeking help for mental health is essential.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:40am - 10:00am
034 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Perceived Dietary Choices, Nutritional Knowledge and Food Consumption Patterns among College Students
Dietary patterns, well-being and nutritional knowledge among university students are of interest as weight gain in college years is common and adult dietary habits are often set during these formative years of early adulthood. Twenty-two students from the University of North Carolina Asheville participated in a two-part study aimed at understanding the relationship between nutritional knowledge and daily food consumption. An online survey was administered to identify dietary patterns, knowledge of nutritional needs, and emotions related to each student’s eating habits. Each student recorded everything they ate over the course of two days and these food logs were compared to survey responses. A disconnect between how students believe they are eating and what they are actually consuming was observed. While over 73 percent of students believed they were meeting daily recommendations, only 23 percent met their daily carbohydrate and fiber needs. Eighty-six percent of students felt they were meeting their energy needs daily, yet only 36 percent came within 90-120 percent of their recommended energy needs.  If a disjunction exists between students’ perceived dietary patterns, perceived nutritional needs, and what they actually eat, these misconceptions result in persistent nutritional inadequacies. These mismatches have the capability of causing long-term health problems in later adulthood.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:40am - 10:00am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

9:40am

The Influence Of Money, Honor, And Property In Edmund Burke’s East Indian Policy
In 1765 kinsmen of Edmund Burke, the famous eighteenth-century British statesman, invested heavily in East India Company stock, which exponentially rose the next 3 years. The Burkes shared money, therefore, Edmund Burke bought an expensive country estate in Beaconsfield in 1768. However, in 1769, news that military conflict had broken out in India reached Britain. This news caused East India Company stocks to plummet which financially ruined Edmund Burke and his kinsmen. Edmund Burke almost lost his new estate which was a crucial component of his growing personal honor. Scholars have long refuted the influence of Burke’s personal life on his politics. This thesis seeks to highlight the importance of Burke’s finances and honor on his East India Company political policy through three aspects of Burke’s life including the importance of his estate, Burke’s desire to secure a venerable reputation to posterity, and a lawsuit against Burke in 1783.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:40am - 10:00am
014 Whiteside Hall

9:40am

Between The Firs: Travelers Of The Blue Ridge Parkway
Between The Firs: Travelers Of The Blue Ridge Parkway is a short, participatory style documentary film about encounters and attractions of motorists, motorcyclists and bicyclists traveling the Blue Ridge Parkway. Completed under the instruction of Professor Anne Slatton in VMP 293, this project is by Kat Skinner, Brian Black, and Dylan Bowser.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:40am - 10:00am
012 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Kubrick: Voyeur With A Camera
Through careful analyzation of Stanley Kubrick’s filmography, I explore how each film is the work of a director who has a very specific and unique view of human nature. From his earliest works, Kubrick has successfully conveyed his own sense of what humanity means, what it truly means to be human, and what lies beyond the borders separating human desire and human morality. Through Kubrick’s innate ability to create a sense of both normalcy and surrealism within the same environments, he is able to control not only the characters on screen, but also the audience.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:40am - 10:00am
016 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Marquee Moon: The New Wave Sonata
The New York City music scene of the early 1970s was an exciting one: the influence of the no-wave music was heavy, and punk wasn’t too far away. In 1974 the band Television secured a residency at one of the most influential clubs in New York, CBGB’s, and was placed into the foreground of the new wave movement. After recording their first single independently, Television received a deal with Elektra Records and recorded their debut album Marquee Moon (1977). The title track is a staggering composition/improvisation that runs for almost eleven minutes, and despite punk music’s rebellious nature, this piece arguably follows one of the most traditional forms of classical music, sonata form. Typically when such a well formed and complete model for musical form exists, there is a tendency to place this category in isolation; either a piece of music empirically conforms or it does not. However, aspects of sonata form translate to other genres more readily than one might think, for example, one of the most prominent elements of sonata form is the presence of two contrasting melodies, what could be considered in pop music to be the verse and chorus. In the case of “Marquee Moon” there are many elements that link it closely with sonata form and others that separate it. Using Ken Stephenson’s What to Listen for in Rock, as well as materials by Hepokoski and Darcy, and William Caplin this paper aims to analyze this coexistence of form and disarray.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:40am - 10:00am
018 Lipinsky Hall

9:40am

Community Perceptions Of Academic, Social, And Health Behaviors Of Rural Adolescents
Rural Americans engage in more risky behaviors than their urban and suburban counterparts, which lead to higher morbidity and mortality rates from preventable causes. High levels of community buy-in are critical to address the unique combination of obstacles that rural communities face. This study seeks to assess a rural community’s perception of its assets and needs in order to illuminate areas in which strategic action may be implemented to help the youth be healthy and successful. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty-six community leaders, parents, and students in Western North Carolina. Key topics included academic, social, and health behaviors among youth. Preliminary analysis using a grounded theory approach to coding the interviews demonstrates strong community desire for the creation of extracurricular programs that provide academic tutoring, job preparation, and social engagement. However, barriers to transportation and safety concerns relating to violence must first be reduced in order for proposed programs to be effective. Future research should explore ways and means to increase safety within the rural community as well as make reliable transportation available.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:40am - 10:00am
237 Zageir Hall

9:40am

Soil Characterization at Four Sarracenia Wetlands
Carnivorous plants prefer nutrient poor soils due to their advantage to absorb nutrients through foliar absorption. The endangered species Mountain Sweet Pitcher Plant (Sarracenia rubra ssp. jonesii) inhabits increasingly scarce Southern Appalachian wetlands, and characterizing current soil conditions will allow for detection of nutrient shifts and provide a better understanding of the traits a site would possess in order for Sarracenia to thrive. Soil organic carbon was determined by loss-on-ignition method, and percentage of sand, silt, and clay and soil pH were determined by standard methods. Base cations were quantified via Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. At McClure’s fen, organic carbon and CEC appeared to have increased since the data collected in a similar study in 2000, although the values were found to be not statistically different when a Student’s t-test was applied. The average pH at the 0-16 cm depth was lower in 2016 than in 2000, with values of 4.37 and 4.52, respectively. Texture analysis demonstrated that pitcher plants prefer sandy, loamy soils rather than clay.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:40am - 10:20am
014 Zeis Hall

10:00am

Keepin' It in the Groove - A Study of Contemporary Fusion

Music critic and social theorist Simon Frith’s (1996) examination of genre provides a framework to examine how genres may emerge discursively from contemporary society more widely.  I use this framework to examine the relationship between contemporary composition and performance, specifically in Contemporary Fusion, and how the audience’s perception of this performative relationship affects the way in which they define the music and thereby come to define themselves. The emergent genre that I call “Contemporary Fusion” (CF)—a set of compositional and performative practices with a potential lineage tracing back to 1970s acts Return To Forever, the Headhunters, or Weather Report, which Kevin Fellezs (2011) understands as Fusion—provides a rich opportunity for me to confront this emergent “genrefication” process empirically, analyzing the breadth of conceptual musical influences it compromises.  A telling exemplar of this emergent CF genre is Snarky Puppy.  Their “rabid fanbase”, as Chinen (2015) calls it, attends to their musical performances in many different and revealing ways.  Snarky Puppy (along with similar bands) manages to appeal to the pretentiously complex jazz snob, the party-oriented jam band junkie, and the extraordinarily average pop-radio guy all at the same time within the same song (three terms derived from Frith’s three discourses considered in detail below). My research, which includes sociological fieldwork, theoretical analysis, and original composition, analyzes which of these groups’ compositional choices (i.e. harmonic, rhythmic, and melodic ideas) and performance practices (i.e. song choice, conversation with audience, performative energy level, etc.) create an environment where many kinds of listening can occur.


Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:00am - 10:20am
018 Lipinsky Hall

10:15am

Survey Of Culturable Bacterial Communities Found In Sarracenia Purpurea Var. Montana In Western North Carolina.
Sarracenia purpurea var. montana is a rare subspecies of the carnivorous purple pitcher plant located within limited habitats in North Carolina bogs. Pitcher plants have tubular leaves that form pitchers which collect water. In this fluid, there is a diverse community of symbiotic organisms, including bacteria and invertebrates. To identify the bacterial species in these carnivorous plants, fourteen fluid samples from Sarracenia purpurea var. montana pitchers from different individual plants were collected. Sample sites were Dupont State Forest and Sherwood Forest in Western North Carolina. The collected bacteria were grown, DNA was extracted, and bacterial 16s rRNA was amplified using PCR. Sanger sequencing was conducted on the PCR products. Species were identified by comparing these results to previously published DNA sequences.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 10:35am
038 Karpen Hall

10:15am

Dream Runner: Let’s Build A Mobile Game!
The mobile application market is one of the biggest markets in technology, with mobile games being one of the most popular sections, worth 20 billion dollars globally. This popularity has caused the game development and design skills to be valuable. Dream Runner was a personal learning experience, an opportunity to develop a mobile game from scratch, while still being an enjoyable game for users. Following the popular model, Dream Runner is an endless game where the player tries to go as far as possible without hitting any obstacles along the way. All of the game assets are original and designed with the theme of dreams and nightmares using 2D vector graphics in Adobe Illustrator. The game was developed on the Corona SDK and simulator using the Lua programming language. Users employed the simulator to extensively test the game to ensure it was enjoyable and functional. After two iterations of user testing and revisions, the app was deployed to the Apple Store, completing the mobile game development but allowing for improvements through updates.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 10:35am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

10:15am

The Golden State’s Moment: A Critical Examination of California’s Cap-and-Trade Design, Implementation, and Lessons
The purpose of this research paper is to evaluate the efficacy of and propose reforms to California’s cap-and-trade policy for carbon emissions. This carbon pricing scheme is a landmark economic policy in the fight against anthropogenic climate change. We look at policy design options implemented over the history of cap-and-trade policy at the state, regional, federal, and international levels, and derive best practices. We then evaluate California’s cap-and-trade policy based upon these lessons, detailing by which metrics the policy design is sound, and by which metrics it could be improved to ensure economic efficiency and political feasibility. We find that California’s cap-and-trade system successfully limits transaction costs and allows banking, but is hindered by low certainty, a too-low emissions cap, and uncertain use of revenue, resulting in political instability. To the extent that California remedies this issues, the state’s cap-and-trade program figures to prove economically and politically viable to a greater extent, which will increase the likelihood of carbon pricing implementation in the United States and abroad.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 10:35am
035 Karpen Hall

10:15am

The Fabric Of His Life: Exploring The Nature Of The Unreal In Look Homeward, Angel
Thomas Wolfe describes Look Homeward, Angel in the book’s note to the reader as being drawn from “experience which is now far and lost, but which was once part of the fabric of his life.” Wolfe’s insistence of autobiography in Look Homeward, Angel makes the scenes of the fantastical and the unreal all the more striking. When Wolfe’s actual upbringing is examined, moreover, the scenes of the unreal emerge as coping mechanisms for various elements of his personal life. These episodes that are unmoored by reality distance Wolfe from various elements of his tumultuous childhood, whether it be his feelings of inadequacy when interacting with women, or the heartbreaking loss of his brother. Once these coping mechanisms are identified, Eugene, who is a placeholder for Wolfe himself, becomes a more unreliable source of narration, resulting in a reading experience that is rooted in truth, but is never too far from a scene of pure wonderment.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 10:35am
232 Karpen Hall

10:15am

Food Waste Awareness
Food waste is one of the most serious issues on our planet and could become epidemic if we do not act soon. Food waste contributes to almost 20% more carbon emissions than motor vehicles. It accounts for a quarter of the mass in our landfills. Food is wasted in a multitude of ways and not just on a consumer level. It is wasted from transportation from where it is grown to where it is sold because of a lack of proper care or refrigeration. It is also wasted with poor environmental conditions during display, and having inadequate market facilities. The more common way people think of food being wasted is on a supplier and consumer level. The characteristic of the food, such as the expiration date, popularity of the food, or if the food is in season, will determine if it is bought or left on the shelves to be thrown away. Food waste is not only a problem to our planet but it is also causing one in six Americans to go hungry everyday and many more people around the world. My proposed study is to perfect ways of reversing the poor environmental effects of food waste. My presentation will show people how they are harming the environment and how to better save food and reverse the detrimental affects of food waste.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 10:35am
034 Karpen Hall

10:15am

Choose Your Friends Wisely: Filibuster William Walker's Fall From Power
In the mid-19th century, spurred on by the ideals of Manifest Destiny, American filibusterers looked to Central America for US expansion. Southern Democrats looking for territories in which to expand slavery funded filibuster campaigns and lobbied for annexation of Caribbean and Central American territories. The most renowned of the filibusters, William Walker, invaded Central America with a small military force to attempt a takeover of the government. He succeeded in becoming the president of Nicaragua, and served from July 12, 1856 to May 1, 1857. The bulk of his financial and material support for his endeavor came from pro-slavery expansionists. Though previously known as an abolitionist, Walker allowed these investors and their money to convince him to legalize slavery in Nicaragua. With that decision he lost the support of the Northern states and the United States Government. This research examines government documents, Walker’s correspondence, and both Northern and Southern US newspaper articles to show how Walker’s acquiescence to Pierre Soule, Jane Cazneau, and other pro-slavery expansionists led to the failure of his mission.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 10:35am
014 Whiteside Hall

10:15am

The House That Kubrick Built: An Analysis Of A Director Through The Prism Of Architecture
Architecture is an ancient art form civilizations have used for generations to express cultural identity. This research applies the lens of architecture, and specifically the work of Andrea Palladio’s Four Books of Architecture, as an artistic guide for which to analyze the works of Stanley Kubrick. It is the goal of this presentation to show that the house upon which Kubrick builds his art is purely symbolic, and that through the application of Palladio’s architectural ideals it is possible to decipher the meaning of Kubrick's symbols and bring to the surface the philosophical blueprint on which the director communicates his views on the human condition

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 10:35am
016 Karpen Hall

10:15am

Yvwi Gvnahita
Fly-fishing “isn’t about catching fish,” as John Townes Van Zandt II says in the film Low and Clear. While, obviously I would still like to capture some footage of beautifully decorated trout, and happy fisher-persons, I hope to explore this assertion further; why do people really go stand in rivers all day, is it really about catching fish, what is the underlying call compelling people towards the river? How do different life philosophies/ personalities/ convictions come out through fishing?

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 10:35am
012 Karpen Hall

10:15am

Disability, Identity, And Resistance: A Content Analysis Of Disability Related Blogs
Social stigma has a profound impact in the daily lives of individuals with disabilities. Within the last few decades, however, technological advancements have provided a new medium that has the potential to transform how people with disabilities express themselves and connect with community. The internet has opened the door to new methods of working around the pervasive nature of discrimination and prejudice that individuals with disabilities have to face. While the internet is not exempt from such forces, it offers a platform for unfiltered self representation and community connection. This research aims to illuminate the ways that people with disabilities use the internet to navigate social stigma through virtual communities. An ongoing content analysis of a random sample of disability related blogs seeks to examine the helping capabilities of the internet for individuals with disabilities while also exploring issues and solutions pertaining to online accessibility. Using a grounded theory approach, blogs are coded for themes of identity, connection, and accessibility among others. Through this exploratory research, a better understanding can emerge regarding how the web can be utilized as an important resource for the millions of people living with disabilities.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 10:35am
237 Zageir Hall

10:15am

Diverse Utility and Synthesis of Pyrrole Derivatives of Combretastatin A-4 for Anti-Cancer Purposes

Combretastatin A-4 analogs have been proven to provide anti-inflammatory, antimitotic, anti-invasive, antibacterial and anticancer properties. Specifically, chalcone analogs- the least studied- have demonstrated positive bioactivity in the apoptosis of certain types of cancers. Derivatives of these analogs may lead to the production of pyrroles, particularly, Lamellarins. Chalcone derivatives with structural features parallel to those of the isolated natural product of the South African bush willow, Combretastatin A-4, maintain the function of binding to the β-tubulin, which interrupts vascular function in mitotic replication- including those of MDR cancer cells. This natural compound, however, is not soluble within the bloodstream. This research examines the synthesis of pyrrole analogs derived from tubulin binding chalcones. Specific substitutions of these chalcones, which were synthesized via the Claisen-Schmidt methodology, were established in order to prospectively increase the activity of this molecule within the bloodstream. The final product maintains the trimethoxy feature of CA-4 in order to bind to the colchicine binding site of the β-tubulin.


Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 11:15am
014 Zeis Hall

10:15am

Early Responses Of Rhododendron Maximum Removal Within Southern Appalachian Riparian Areas In The Wake Of Eastern Hemlock Loss: Microclimate And Species Diversity
In the wake of eastern hemlock loss in the southern Appalachian Mountains due to the invasive Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, Rhododendron maximum growth in areas collocated with eastern hemlocks has increased at a rate three times faster than rhododendron growing in areas without hemlock trees. Microclimate changes due to canopy removal drive changes in basic forest processes including seedling recruitment which is strongly linked to soil moisture availability and light. The effects of rhododendron removal on the local ecosystem were examined by measuring microclimate variables and herbaceous-layer recruitment in areas of active rhododendron growth (control areas) and areas where rhododendron removal has occurred at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory and White Oak Creek watershed in Macon County, North Carolina. Photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD; μmol m-2 s-1), and volumetric soil water content (%WC) in the upper 20 cm of soil were measured at 1 m2 quadrats located in removal and control plots throughout the basins. Pre-treatment measurements of microclimate variables occurred in June 2014 with cut treatments occurring in February 2015 and burn treatments occurring in February 2016. Post-treatment measurements occurred after the first growing season in June 2016. Overall, PPFD increased after the removal of rhododendron with each of the treatment types, and the greatest increase occurred in plots with both cut and burn treatments. There was a significant increase in species richness correlated to percentage of light reaching the forest floor with post treatment measurements. Soil water content measurements did not show a significant change between pre- and post-treatment measurements. Although there were measurable responses in microclimatic variables in treatment areas, there was not a significant enough departure from pre-treatment conditions to prove a tree recruitment response in the first growing season. Continued monitoring in successive growing seasons will help to discern how changes in microclimate affect herbaceous layer recruitment.

Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Population Distribution, Genetics, And Microhabitat Of Plethodon Welleri
Plethodon welleri is a species of salamander endemic to a limited range of high elevation areas in North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. In this project, areas with historical records of P. welleri and high elevation forest in Western NC and VA were surveyed and tissue samples were collected from three populations. Methodology was established for surveying this species’ microhabitat, which was used to collect and manipulate data regarding a number of different variables such as soil conditions and co-occurring species. Of multiple high elevation forests surveyed, only three P. welleri populations were established. These findings indicate that P. welleri is at high risk of extirpation.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Effects Of Oleylamine To Oleic Acid Ratios In The Surfactant-Assisted Synthesis Of Anisotropic Brookite Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles
Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have a wide variety of properties that can be utilized for industrial and academic functions. TiO2 is a common and non-toxic material that can be used in the photocatalysis of organic molecules. The most common forms of these particles are anatase and rutile. This experiment focused on the synthesis of the less common, brookite crystal structure. In addition, we looked at how different ratios of Oleylamine (OLAM) in the synthesis affect the growth of the nanocrystals. Synthesized particles were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
014 Zeis Hall

10:15am

Paclitaxel Coated Gold (Au) Nanoparticles (NPs) For Drug Delivery In Chemotherapy
Current chemotherapy medications can not tell healthy cells and cancerous cells apart. This inability of distinction leads to healthy cell toxicity. Nanomaterials for drug delivery can be used to directly target cancer cells with a smaller dose of medication, reducing the risk of toxicity to the healthy cells. The most promising are Au NPs, which can be loaded with Paclitaxel. Paclitaxel is a chemotherapy medication used for breast cancer, and is regarded as one of the most effective chemotherapy medications. Intravenously (IV) administered Paclitaxel-coated NPs require no premedication before treatment, and can be administered in 30 minutes. In this presentation, synthesis and characterization of Paclitaxel-coated NPs is presented.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
014 Zeis Hall

10:15am

Fault-Slip History Along The Right-Lateral Indian Head Fault Within The Central Walker Lane, West-Central Nevada
The Walker Lane is a zone of right-lateral (dextral) shear that is 700 km long and extends from eastern California into western Nevada, and north into northern California. The Pacific and North American tectonic plates move ~50 mm per year relative to each other and most of that motion is accommodated on the San Andreas fault. However, approximately 25% of fault-slip movement is accommodated by faults to the east of the San Andreas fault, including the Walker Lane. This study constrains the fault-slip history on the Indian Head fault within the Central Walker Lane. Through mapping various sized fault offsets of debris flows and beheaded streams both in the field and from aerial imagery, slip amounts were identified and measured. High-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) were generated by Structure for Motion and used to make the offset measurements using a MATLAB GUI called LaDiCaoz. This work shows fault dextral offset amounts ranging from ~4 to 58.4 m along the Indian Head fault zone. Using field mapping and matching debris flows through point counts and fines samples of offset surfaces confirms the offset range of specific geomorphic features. Through reconstruction of displaced alluvial deposits and stream channels, strike-slip constraints have been defined along the Indian Head Fault at two sites. At the Mid site, offset alluvial deposits appear to be younger and have smaller offset amounts than the South site, which has the largest offset amounts and suggests that this site has older alluvial deposits and accumulated more displacement through more earthquakes.

Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Vetruvia: The Experience of Starting a Business in Asheville

This semester I delved into what it takes to start a business in the flourishing entrepreneurship scene of Asheville, by putting my Asheville education into action and truly trying to start my own business..  This independent study has followed my two business partners and I as we try to start Vetruvia, an art rental business looking to expand the way we experience art, by offering more affordable ways to get local art in your house or business while also providing another stream of income for the artists. We are doing this by offering the ability to rent art. Members will be able to test a piece before they buy, with the cost of rental going towards the purchasing price. Members interested in creating a deeper connection with the art scene, can continuously rotate out new art, keeping their home/business aesthetically fresh and stimulating. In order to get this idea off the ground I have had to write business plans, models, marketing analysis, as well as getting out in the field, and talking to those involved in the local art scene, I have learned so much about the local art scene and what it takes to start a business and would love to share it with you.


Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

The Sound of Glass: Creating Music ThroughScience
This poster, created by the students of UNCA’s Music Theory Club, demonstrates the process of tuning water glasses to specific pitches, as directed by composer Ēriks Ešenvalds for his choral piece “Stars”. Our display includes detailed procedural guidelines for tuning glasses, information about the nature of the overtone series and its relationship to tuned glasses, the physical properties of glass as they relate to its resonant capacity, historical background regarding the application of the overtone series in music theory, quantitative data comparing volume of water in a glass to its fundamental resonant frequency, as well as qualitative data discussing the practicality of performing with tuned glasses. These data were obtained during the preparation for our performance.
In presenting this poster we seek to examine the meaningful connections that exist between music making and the physical sciences. Inquiry into the nature of sound as a physical phenomenon affords insight into how it can be organized by human agents into expressive artifacts of culture. Using tuned water glasses as a case study, our poster demonstrates the existence of an oft-ignored dualism at the heart of sound-art: the parallel nature of music as artistic expression and as physical manipulation of the natural world.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Creative Interpretations: Understanding The Science In Popular Culture
What makes us tick? This is a question that has haunted humankind for millennia. Several popular culture books have captivated audiences offering explanations for our human behavior. Some works delve more specifically into how to stop bad habits, or how to obtain desired behaviors such as creative thinking. Kevin Ashton’s How to Fly a Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery was selected as the summer reader for all 2016 incoming freshman at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. The work offers an alternative view into the creative process, and submits social, biological, and neurological evidence of how creativity really works. Ashton interweaves science and storytelling into his advice on how to approach the creative process. When science is conveyed to the public there are often areas of miscommunication, misrepresentation, and bias, yet these issues are seldom discussed. To better understand how science is being represented in popular culture, a critical review of Ashton’s work was conducted, and several sources were reanalyzed and compared to Ashton’s interpretations. Further literature into the systemic balance of novelty and uncertainty from the neurological aspect is explored in order to 1) clarify the currently accepted relationships of creativity, uncertainty, familiarity, novelty, and emotional and physical pain; 2) illuminate what is currently understood about the ability to recognize and respond to both novel and familiar situations; and 3) explore if emotional and physical pain are neurologically linked.

Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Developing Patch Clamp Analysis Techniques To Deorphanize VSNRs
Major urinary proteins (MUPs) are a class of species-specific pheromones that have been found to produce consistent and specific behavioral responses in mice independent of prior conditioning. MUPs are detected through an accessory olfactory system known as the vomeronasal organ, which expresses sensory receptors (VSNRs) designed for MUP binding. Here the activity of VNSRs is intended to be studied using patch clamp analysis by recording VNSR activation upon exposure to specific MUPs as evidenced by voltage change. HEK 293 cells will be transfected to express VNSRs for analysis. The current primary goal includes developing efficient transfection protocol and patch clamp procedure. This research is proposed to allow for the future tracing of synaptic projections throughout the brain beginning with VSNR activation, providing insight into the neurological basis of behavioral reactions.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Do We Really Need 8 Hours of Sleep?
Once in awhile headlines will pop up in the news prompted by newly discovered side effects of sleep deprivation or new methods of catching up on sleep, because, as news Anchors will sigh, “People aren’t getting their eight hours of sleep.” We want to look at how eight hours of sleep came to be widely acknowledged as the healthy amount of sleep for an adult, and the neuroscience behind that claim. Sleep studies and a growing understanding of the brain highlighted just how important sleep was to our functionality. It’s been shown that our bodies need sleep, more than even food as, while it takes two weeks to starve to death, ten days without sleep can kill you. Why do we need sleep so badly, and more importantly to our interest, why eight hours? In a society that keeps demanding so much of our time, the facts behind “Needing our eight hours” are increasingly important.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Does Playing chess improve cognitive abilities?
Chess is a world-renowned board game, that involves strategic ability to overcome an opponent, and is often considered a battle of intellect. There is evidence to suggest that chess positively impacts upon your brain’s ability to retain information or to think critically about a specific subject. Even in popular culture there are many depictions that indicate that chess boasts intelligence, such as a recurring scene in X-men where the two main characters, who are portrayed as the most intelligent, are discussing their strategies over a game of chess. Chess was also used as propaganda by the Russians against the U.S. in the Cold War, claiming to have superior intelligence due to their brilliant chess players. Whether it be in a laboratory or in movies, chess’ influence on the brain and in the world has shown to be great. But does this really affect your brain? Is the game in any way helpful in allowing you to learn faster? Here we explore published studies to investigate whether chess has been shown to assist people in school.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Effects Of Hormone Treatments On Major Urinary Protein (MUP) Expression In AML12 Hepatocytes
Many social behaviors in mice, such as aggression, mating and territorial marking, are mediated by the major urinary proteins (MUPs) present in their urine. While the mouse genome codes for 21 MUPs, any given male mouse only expresses a subset of these proteins at a defined concentration. Mice are able to detect the identity and concentration of the MUPs they encounter, and as such, these proteins appear to act as an “individuality signal.” However, how a unique subset of MUPs is chosen for expression remains largely unknown. This study focuses on the control of gene expression of the 21 MUP genes, consisting of the highly similar “central” MUPs and the variable, divergent “peripheral” MUPs. Using hormone treatments on a cultured liver cell line, the expression of MUPs can be induced and studied, which allows for the manipulation of regulatory mechanisms. In an effort to understand the mechanisms controlling MUP choice and expression, this study explores the role that testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and growth hormone treatments play in AML12 male hepatocytes. Utilizing RNA isolation, cDNA synthesis, and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), the effects of these hormones on MUP expression were analyzed and studied using gel electrophoresis. Because of their complex expression patterns, the MUPs serve as a good model system to study long standing molecular biology questions regarding mechanisms controlling gene expression.

Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Mental Illness Portrayed in Art
Neuroscience is represented in popular culture in a multitude of ways. Through movies, music, television, art, and books we can obtain a deeper understanding of how society believes the human brain works. Though these representations might not be accurate to true neuroscience, we can decipher what aspects of it are true and what are not. These discrepancies in the portrayals are also good clues as to what life was like and what science was at the time of their creation. Here we explore how depression is portrayed in art through different artists’ interpretations. By comparing the different ways depression is depicted by various artists’ artwork we hope to get a better understanding of how the time period and experiences of the artist shaped their understanding of mental health. We’ll be comparing two paintings that were made by artists who had depression. The first painting is by Edvard Munch titled The Scream and the second painting is by Vincent Van Gogh, a portrait he painted of himself with a bandage over his ear. These two paintings show how painters can express the same emotions, but very differently. We will be looking into how their depression was exhibited in their paintings and how true of a depiction it is of neuroscience. We will also explore the circumstance of their experience with depression and compare them to determine if the manifestation of the illness is different based on what caused it.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Neil Harbisson’s Eyeborg
Technology has permeated everyday life at an ever-increasing pace, but neuroscience has taken the spotlight. Avant-garde artist Neil Harbisson is the perfect example of this change, as he holds the title of first legally recognized cyborg in human history. Born with total greyscale vision, he sought to correct his vision by implanting a cybernetic appendage, resembling an angler fish’s esca, which translates infrared waves into audible tones that he has learned to associate with color. Harbisson is also the cofounder of the Cyborg Foundation which aims to protect and support future cyborgs worldwide. Neil Harbisson’s implant does much more than inform an artist of the vast spectrum of colors, it also has a much wider function in introducing humanity to a vast number of possibilities in the fields of augmentation and implants, and their subsequent impact on society. Questions will arise concerning these bodily modifications like: how are implants to be regulated, can the enhanced compete with the original humans, when is a person more machine than human or even human at all, what will be the reaction to visible implants, do cyborgs have the same rights as original humans? In this project, we intend to focus our investigations into five broad categories that are intended to expand upon and postulate the outcomes of many of the questions presented above. These fields of interest include: legislation, society, the arts, ethics, and science. Neil Harbisson is the only of his kind today, but the discussion of augmented humans must be seriously considered for the not-to-far-off future.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

The Science Behind Online Student’s Tips
As college students in 2016, we are inundated with a myriad of infographics and articles brimming with study tips that promise to boost test scores and memory retention. Yet few of these articles cite any scientific studies, leading us to ask if there is any actual science behind their claims. Some tips such as eating a balanced diet, staying hydrated, and exercising regularly have been around for years and have become part of common knowledge. Others, however, are rather new and radical. Does meditation and prayer boost our brain function? Can it be possible that the best time of day to study is 4­6 am? In this presentation we will explore whether or not science supports these different tips including whether time of day and oxygen levels affect study effectiveness; whether diet, exercise, sleep, and hydration boost brain function; and if meditation and certain foods guarantee an A.

Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Computational Modeling of Surface Enhancement
Silver nanoparticles, when used as a Raman spectroscopy substrate, give rise to an effect known as surface enhancement. Oscillations of the conduction electrons on the surface of the silver nanoparticles enhance nearby electric fields, including the light incident on and scattered from these particles. This enhancement can increase the intensity of the light by a factor of up to ten billion. The cause of this enhancement, and the techniques and applications which take advantage of it, are still subjects of ongoing research. In particular, there is a strong dependence of surface enhancement on particle size an radius of curvature. Prior research projects suggest that analytical approaches to modeling surface enhancement are limited to the simplest possible shapes and smallest numbers of particles, and cannot be extended to realistic situations. This research applies computational electrodynamics to model silver nanostructures created by ferroelectric lithography.

Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Electrostatics Of The Growth And Formation Of Silver Nanoparticles On A Ferroelectric Template
The lithographic growth of silver nanoparticles on a ferroelectric substrate is investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The initial process of particle formation is well described by the kinetic interactions between the silver ions in a dilute silver nitrate solution and the electrons in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) substrate. However, as more silver is deposited onto the substrate, the electrostatic properties of the growing nanoparticles more profoundly influence where silver ions will continue to accumulate. By observing the nanoparticles at various stages of development, it is found that ordinary nanoparticles on a smooth, clean substrate first form as discontinuous collections of point-like particles. Further deposition results in larger, jagged particles. As these particles gather more silver, their edges become more rounded until they reach a maximum volume. Furthermore, it is shown that the condition of the substrate profoundly affects nanoparticle formation. A better understanding of how previously deposited silver affects the future deposition of silver ions still in solution will allow future research more control over wire properties, such as shape and size. This is particularly advantageous for applications that are highly dependent on nanoparticle dimensions, such as surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), a method of detecting and characterizing single biomolecules or trace impurities.

Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Image Analysis of Nanoparticles Grown on Ferroelectric Substrates
The goal of this research is to improve the quality of nanowires grown on periodically poled (PP) ferroelectric substrates. Image analysis software is used to measure changes in particle size and separation that are caused by varying the growth parameters (i.e. the deposition time and solution concentration). A PP substrate is divided into many oppositely poled electric regions which create anomalously strong electric fields where they are connected. Covering the substrate with a solution of silver nitrate and exposing it to ultraviolet light causes promotion of electrons to the conduction band which are then free to photoreduce the silver. Since the electric field is strongest at the domain boundaries the silver tends to deposit there, creating wire-like structures. Topographic images are then taken with a Scanning Electron Microscope allowing the nanoparticles to be observed. After the pictures are archived the nanoparticles are analyzed further by the software application ImageJ to gather such statistics as the number of particles and their average size. The deposition time and solution concentration are varied during the experiment, creating nanowires of variable size, shape, and separation. Through the analysis of the particles associated with varying parameters we analyze the correlation between particle size and different combinations of depositions times and solution concentrations.

Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Investigation of Methods for Patterned Fabrication of Silver Nanowires on a Ferroelectric Substrate
The aim of this project is to investigate the potential for patterned exposure of a ferroelectric substrate to an electron beam source to change the poling structure of the substrate. The specific substrate for this investigation is Periodically Poled Lithium Niobate. The electron beam source was a scanning electron microscope. This is a summary of the effect of spot size, magnification, and duration on the poling structure of the substrate. As of now, none of the experiments were successful in producing the poling changes which were the aim of this line of research. This investigation points towards future research which may be more fruitful than this inquiry. A section of suggested future research is included at the end of the paper.

Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Measuring Variations of the Speed of Sound in a Corrugated Tube
This work studies how the speed of sound in a corrugated tube decreases relative to the speed in free space. Previous students at the University of North Carolina Asheville have engaged in research to determine this speed. The results from these studies were obtained with an uncertainty that rendered the changes of speed within the tube undeterminable due to low sampling rate. Other experimenters have published similar experiments under the assumption that the change in the speed of sound remains constant throughout the tube. This study seeks to refine previous research by measuring possible variations in the speed along the tube’s length. To accomplish this, a higher sampling rate and noise reduction procedures will be used to lower uncertainty, thereby allowing the accuracy necessary to map the change of the speed of sound as it travels through the tube. This will be done by using a ‘one-shot’ method in which frequency controlled bursts of sound are received by a decreasingly distant sound sensor.

Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Correlations Between Acceptance And Knowledge Of Autism In College Students
This study is designed to examine the knowledge and attitudes that college students have of individuals with Autism.  A three-part survey will be utilized to conduct this research.  The three parts of the survey will include a demographics portion, a situational portion to assess college students’ attitudes toward individuals with Autism, and a knowledge portion to determine how much knowledge college students have in regards to Autism.  The purpose of this study is to determine if there is a correlation between students’ scores on the situational portion and students’ scores on the knowledge portion.  We anticipate that students who score higher on the knowledge portion of the survey, meaning that they have a greater amount of knowledge regarding Autism, will have higher scores on the situational portion of the survey as well, meaning that they demonstrate a greater amount of acceptance towards individuals with Autism, than students who have low scores on the knowledge portion.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Cyberloafing In Class And At Work
This project examines how perceptions of fairness about technology policies affect frequency of cyberloafing, and what emotions students and employees experience in relation to their fairness perceptions. Much of the extant literature explores the relationship between emotions and cyberloafing behaviors in the workplace. Studies have relied on a number of theories from psychology and organizational behavior, including Organizational Justice Theory, the Ego-Depletion Model of Self Control, and Theory of Planned Behavior, among others, but this study aims to validate the perception of fairness as another possibility to explain these emotions. Cyberloafing in the classroom has had very little attention from the psychology world, and controlled experiments are incredibly difficult to erect in the natural workplace environment. This study explore fairness perceptions of both classroom and workplace technology policies in an attempt to provide more information for practical use of technology policies in a rapidly growing technological society. Participants will be given a survey of fifteen questions. They will be asked about their perception of the technology policy that they function under most often (as either an employee or as a student), how often they engage in cyberloafing, and what emotions they experience after cyberloafing. The central hypothesis is that participants who perceive the policy as unfair will engage in more cyberloafing and experience more positive emotions afterwards than do participants who perceive the policy as fair.

Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Evidence Of Racism In Television News Reporting Of Police Shootings
This is an archival study on the implicit and explicit biases shown by network newscasters from the “Big Three” news television channels (Fox, MSNBC, and CNN) in relation to the fatal shooting of African American civilians by the police over the last three months. Three African American civilians who were shot and killed by police officers between July and September 2016 were selected and one television clip from each of the three news channels was studied. Instances of racially influenced bias are coded using a variety of measures such as: facial cues, language used to describe the victim, how the victim was presented to the viewers, and body language of the casters. We predict that the data will show that each network will have instances of both implicit and explicit bias. If our hypothesis is supported, then it will highlight the potential bias that mainstream media in the United States displays against African American individuals, which will in turn help the reader to create a realistic expectation of information sources. The study has powerful implications for the general public; there could be a great deal of cognitive dissonance as people realize that the sources that they trusted to remain objective in fact exhibit a tendency to use negative language and framing devices to describe African American victims.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Harry Potter And The Curse Of Implicit Racial Bias
Implicit attitudes have been found to form around age 10. Implicit attitudes are vital to understanding prejudice. Childhood, particularly before and around 10-years-old, is a time when there might be room for intervention while forming implicit attitudes. Harry Potter is a piece of literature designed for this age range, and contains many anti-racist images, potentially making it a useful tool for combating the development of implicit prejudice. The aim of this study was to link age of exposure to Harry Potter to implicit prejudice scores. Implicit racial prejudice was measured via the Affect Misattribution Procedure. Participants also indicated the age at which they first read a variety of fictional literature, including Harry Potter. We expect that people who were exposed to Harry Potter before age 10 will show lower implicit racial bias scores than those who encountered Harry Potter at an older age. We also expect that exposure to Harry Potter, because of its anti-prejudice message, will show a stronger negative correlation with implicit racial biases than exposure to other popular literature read by kids and young adults. If these hypothesis are supported, then Harry Potter could be a viable means of disrupting children’s development of racial prejudice.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Stroop Effects when Naming Numbers instead of Colors
In the well-known color-naming version of the Stroop task, people’s reactions are slowed and less accurate when naming the color of a word that spells a conflicting color name (e.g. the word “RED” printed in green, correct response being “green”). The effect occurs because people have difficulty not reading the word, reflecting the idea that naming words is a lot more automatic than naming colors, and this causes lexical dominance in that words interfere more with naming colors than do colors interfere with naming words. The present experiment sought to determine if this lexical dominance effect extends to the case of number naming. Either a numeral (“7”) or the word version (“seven”) was presented for a vocal naming response. Above or below the target, either a numeral distractor (“3”) or a word distractor (“three”) appeared. The distractor was either congruent with the target (“7” paired with “7” or with “seven”) or incongruent (“7” paired with “3” or with “three”), and accordingly for word targets. The research question was whether word distractors would cause more interference than numeric distractors. Results showed that such was the case: Greatest interference occurred with numeric targets and lexical distractors, with less but still reliable interference with lexical targets and lexical distractors. Numeric distractors had no effect at all. The results indicate that lexical dominance extends beyond the limited domain of color naming in typical versions of the Stroop task.

Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

To Yield Or Not To Yield; Ambivalent Sexism On Sidewalks
Existing research supports the idea that both benevolent sexism and gendered social norms can influence interactions between men and women. Previous benevolent sexism studies suggest that society may perceive women as a group that needs protection. Infantilizing women due to this subordinate role may influence the way men interact socially with women and vice versa. Additionally, a paternalistic society that supports benevolent sexism is more likely to reinforce the idea of men as dominant, which may also influence interactions across genders and in same-gendered interactions. In this study, we examine pedestrians’ willingness to yield on a sidewalk, manipulating the gender of the person with whom participants come into contact. We hypothesize that women are more likely to yield to a male confederate, whereas men are more likely to yield to a female confederate: the former being a result of perceived power structures in favor of male dominance, the latter being a result of benevolent sexism/paternalistic chivalry. This study has implications for discovering the impacts that benevolent sexism and/or gendered social norms play into our everyday lives.

Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:15am

Underlying Opinions And Beliefs Affecting Custody Decisions
This study examines custody hearings and how ambivalent sexism, both towards men and towards women, affect which parent is given custody in a heterosexual relationship. Ambivalent sexism is broken down into hostile and benevolent sexisms. Hostility and benevolence in ambivalence towards men and women are associated with limiting stereotypes, but hostility has “negative” intentions while benevolence has “positive” intentions. Benevolent sexist beliefs may lead people to be more likely to award custody to a female, because females are ascribed the nurturing stereotype. Hostile beliefs towards men may lead to a similar result where the mother would win custody. Examining ambivalence towards men and women will help describe the relationship between ambivalent sexism and legal decisions. University students were given a questionnaire which included six brief vignettes centered around custody trials. Vignettes were designed so that the characteristics of the parents differed between cases. Participants answered questions regarding custody decisions for these vignettes, as well as filling out the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory and Ambivalence Towards Men Inventory. We hypothesized that the mother would win custody more often in every scenario except where the mother was clearly demonstrated as a worse candidate than the father. We further hypothesized that people with high benevolent sexism and/or high hostility towards men would be more likely to award custody to the mother. These results, if observed, would suggest that the justice system may be swayed by ambivalent sexism when examining custody cases.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse

10:35am

Consequences Of Hybridization On Enzyme Production Between Sarracenia Jonesii And Sarracenia Purpurea
Pitcher plants (Sarracenia spp.) are carnivorous plants commonly found in coastal regions, bogs, and pond margins throughout Eastern North America. Although there are eight well-defined species of Sarracenia, plants readily produce hybrids in the wild. Strategies for obtaining limiting nutrients, such as phosphate and nitrogen, vary among species. Fluid samples were collected from the pitchers of S. jonesii, S. purpurea, and their hybrid over Summer 2016 from Sherwood Forest in Brevard, North Carolina. The fluid extracted from young pitchers was assayed to determine phosphatase activity in each of the species. Comparing the enzymatic activity of these parental species and their hybrid can contribute to the understanding of the consequences of hybridization.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:35am - 10:55am
038 Karpen Hall

10:35am

Techne: The Line Between Art And Computation
Much of today’s art is produced with the assistance of computers and digital technology. Computers are even able to produce artistic works without human interference, once given rules and constraints. These works of art, despite lacking the human touch, can still be aesthetically appealing, even beautiful. Cellular Automation is one of the primary techniques used to produce computer-generated art. It allows individual mathematical models to make choices, either randomly or through guided rulesets. When displayed visually, the results can be striking. Techne is a program that allows a computer to create a work of art, crystalline in design and appearance, with only minimal input from a user. By using Techne, users can witness the strange dichotomy and fusion between natural, mathematical processes and aesthetically pleasing artworks. Techne uses the programming language Processing, a Java-based, object-oriented language developed for visual artists. Users who watch the artwork being “painted” before them were asked a series of questions relating to the visual appeal, beauty, and their interest in the finished product. Techne’s output coupled with the user test results provide unique insight into the way that people react to art that is not entirely born from a human hand.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:35am - 10:55am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

10:35am

Economics Of Cornbread
This project looks at the change in published cornbread recipes during the period in which the southern Appalachians industrialized. Published cookbooks were used to establish changes in foodways, and data from the University of Virginia demonstrated the rise in industrial output as a proportion of the region’s economy. The rise of industry and the wages associated with it, led to an increase in the opportunity costs of preparing meals using home-produced ingredients. When people chose to work outside the home, the foodways shifted. For example, shortening took the place of lard in cornbread and biscuits, and macaroni and cheese became popular.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:35am - 10:55am
035 Karpen Hall

10:35am

“The Seductive Reduction Of India”: Colonial, Missionary, And Educative Pursuits In Jane Eyre
This project examines the colonial and imperial presence in Charlotte Bronte’s nineteenth-century bildungsroman Jane Eyre. Although the novel is almost entirely situated in the domestic space of England, it uses British imperial practices in India to represent and interpret legal, economic, and gendered hegemony in its native country. In particular, St. John’s proposal of and Jane’s willingness to perform educative work in India draws attention to Britain’s colonial project in the region, the primary methods of British colonization and its impacts in nineteenth-century India, as well as the problematic overlaps between Christian theology and colonialist policy. In dramatizing Jane’s choice to stay in England and St. John’s to go to India, Jane Eyre demonstrates its concern with the inconsistencies of religious discourse and practice in its relation to imperialist projects of various kinds.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:35am - 10:55am
232 Karpen Hall

10:35am

Effective HIV Prevention: PrEP
With an estimated 2.1 million new HIV cases diagnosed each year, emphasis is not only on treatment but also on preventative measures. Pre-exposure prophylaxis is a new form of biomedical prevention that was under investigation and is now supported as an effective prevention method by the CDC. When PrEP has been taken consistently, it has been shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in people who are at high risk by up to 86%. PrEP is much less effective if participant efficacy and medication adherence is low. The purpose of this presentation is to inform people of this newly found, successful prevention method for HIV acquisition.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:35am - 10:55am
034 Karpen Hall

10:35am

The Blending of Public and Private Interests in Urban Development in 1920s Asheville
Asheville, North Carolina experienced a boom in urban development in the 1920s as a result of the decade’s economic prosperity. Members of the city’s upper class sought to guide urban growth in order to bolster Asheville’s wealth as well as their own. This thesis examines two major development projects in downtown Asheville during the 1920s and analyzes the political and economic motivators of each. The municipal government’s experiment with professional city planning led to a number of major improvements for the city, but its proposal for a grand civic center caused conflict between Asheville’s elite and its mayor John H. Cathey. The upper class used Progressive Era values of interventionist government and civic virtue to pressure the city to erect a monument that promoted their own economic interests in the form of a civic center. As the city’s wealthy and powerful struggled to collaborate over the construction of Asheville’s city-county complex, tycoon E. W. Grove proved for one last time in Asheville the power of Gilded Age laissez-faire capitalists by creating an entirely new commercial district just a few blocks away. Unconcerned with civic ideals, his transformation of the Battery Park hill was more blatantly driven by modern consumerism. These major projects were fundamentally ideologically different, but both represented the common interests of the city’s elite, namely that of promoting Asheville as a prosperous modern city and travel destination.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:35am - 10:55am
014 Whiteside Hall

10:35am

Effects Of Media Multitasking On The Attention Span
Media multitasking, the act of using two or more digital devices simultaneously, is a fairly recent phenomenon for researchers. Its effects on the human attention span are disputed among researchers due to a lack of quantitative examination within a larger age range. Most studies focus on a younger demographic of Digital Natives, people who have grown up in a media-saturated culture. These studies have not observed long-term effects. The current study compares and contrasts the effects of media multitasking between young adults, ages 18 through 21, and older adults, ages 50 and above. The survey used in a 2013 University of Nebraska study of university students was revised to fit the older demographic of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UNC Asheville, a learning community for adult classes. The current survey asks questions determining levels of distractibility concerning media multitasking.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:35am - 10:55am
012 Karpen Hall

10:35am

Social Media Use And Its Effect On The National Physical Education And School Sport Institute Conference
tweet throughout the entire conference, including providing attendees with important links, quotes, and winning opportunities.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:35am - 10:55am
016 Karpen Hall

10:35am

Murdered For Mental Illness: Examining The Connections Of Identity, Law Enforcement Interactions, And Police Assisted Suicide
The scarcity and inaccessibility of behavioral health resources in the United States often leaves citizens dependent on police for assistance with mental health crises. According to Washington Post data documenting fatal police shootings, at least one fourth of people murdered by police in the United States in 2015 had a mental illness. However, there is still a relative lack of research on the details of lethal use of force against mentally ill individuals. Preliminary results of an ongoing content analysis of news sources found in the 2015 Washington Post database of police shootings reveal that an overwhelming percentage of cases exhibit evidence of police assisted suicide. Police assisted suicide refers to the common tactic of individuals in mental health crises utilizing police use of force to complete their suicide. Knowing that the police often use lethal force against individuals who are deemed as a threat, suicidal individuals mimic those behaviors to provoke the police to shoot them. Data also revealed that many of the deadly altercations were initiated through a welfare check requested by family or neighbors. Both trends give rise to the necessity of addressing law enforcement’s relationship with mental health service. Quantitative analysis of 2015 and 2016 databases also reveal trends pertaining to race, gender, signs of mental illness, and the intersection of those factors in regards to police interactions. Such trends elicit the need for further research.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:35am - 10:55am
237 Zageir Hall

10:55am

Using Molecular Genetics To Distinguish Between Two Congeneric Snake Species From The Western North Carolina Nature Center
Pine snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus) and gopher snakes (Pituophis catenifer) are in the same genus and are morphologically nearly indistinguishable; at the ND4 mitochondrial locus, these species are 93% identical. The Western North Carolina Nature Center has a phenotypically ambiguous Pituophis snake whose species is unknown. We set out to determine if it was a pine snake, a gopher snake, or a hybrid between the two. Shed snake skins were obtained from the WNC Nature Center specimen, a known pine snake individual, and a known gopher snake individual. DNA was extracted from each of the three sheds in multiple reactions, then purified before being PCR-amplified for the ND4 gene. Next, we performed agarose gel electrophoresis on the PCR products and found clear bands in five of the gopher snake samples, seven of the pine snake samples and nine of the unknown samples. Products with bands were cleaned using a QIAquick PCR purification kit and sequenced, then results were compared using BLAST in GenBank. BLAST analysis revealed 99% identity between the known pine snake and a pine snake sequence from GenBank, 93% identity between the known pine snake and a gopher snake sequence from GenBank, 93% identity between the known pine snake and the unknown snake, and 99% identity between the unknown and a gopher snake sequence from GenBank. Based on this, we can conclude that the WNC Nature Center snake is a not pine snake, but a gopher snake.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:55am - 11:15am
038 Karpen Hall

10:55am

UNCA Course Finder
UNC Asheville Course Finder is a data driven website that students can use to create a class schedule. The database contains UNC Asheville courses and all information relevant to each course such as instructor and meeting times. Conflicts in class meeting times are detected automatically. The user will be able to search for a class by title or class code. The results can also be filtered by any of the columns shown on the UNC Asheville class schedule list. My motivation for this project was to help make the course registration process more user friendly and efficient. Iterative user testing ensured the accuracy of the scheduling site.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:55am - 11:15am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

10:55am

The Craft Brewery Scene In Asheville, NC: Key Factors In Its Growth And What Can We Expect In The Coming Years?
Craft Brewing has been growing at a rapid rate throughout the United States in recent years. Some places have seen more rapid growth than the national average when measuring by breweries per capita, up to 6 times as much. This paper analyses what factors contribute to craft brewery growth in these cities that exceed the average and are epicenters of the craft beer movement, such as Asheville, North Carolina. Data from Portland, ME; Grand Rapids, MI; Asheville, NC is examined from the years 2001 to 2015 using a regression model to identify key factors in growth. The results show that tourism, age, and population have the largest impact on the number of craft breweries in these cities. Using this model, the future growth of Asheville’s craft beer industry was also predicted. A time series model was used to forecast each independent variable to be input into the regression model. From this it is predicted that in 2020 Asheville will have 32 breweries in its metropolitan statistical area. This information will help brewers understand the market they are operating in and the benefit of targeting tourist.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:55am - 11:15am
035 Karpen Hall

10:55am

'A Wound So Deep And Ragged': The Vulnerable Body Of Appalachia In Ron Rash's Short Stories
To read the work of Ron Rash is to run one’s hands across the scars, wounds, and callouses of the Appalachian region, and to become immersed in a collection of authentic, traumatic, and complex narratives that settle themselves along the ridges and foothills of the Appalachian mountains. This project places Rash’s short stories within the context of this vulnerable, yet resilient Appalachian landscape and culture he is writing within: one traumatized by extractive industry, cultural exploitation, economic disadvantage, and widespread public misperception. Focusing specifically on Rash’s use of traumatized characters, this thesis analyzes the ways in which Rash humanizes the plight of Appalachia and its people by embodying its trauma within the vulnerable bodies, minds, and lives of such characters. By establishing the lens of Rash’s Appalachia as another kind of traumatized body, this project examines the social impact of Rash’s stories, interrogating how and why readers come to feel empathy for his vulnerable bodies, and whether this empathy provides a pathway towards healing for the Appalachian region. This project contends that, through shifting perceptions surrounding Appalachia and providing an authentically human Appalachian narrative, Rash promotes a more intimate understanding of the Appalachian experience, combating the sentimentalization and oversimplification of the region’s trauma and history.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:55am - 11:15am
232 Karpen Hall

10:55am

Exercise Adherence (Motivation, Money, and Time)
Exercise Adherence is a current concern in our country today. Many adults work an average of forty hours a week limiting time spent for exercise. People leave work tired and have family members or other responsibilities after work, preventing them from working out. Individuals are not able to maintain an exercise program past a few weeks. The ones who do make it over half a year loose the motivation, will power, creativity and energy to want to continue. There are three major limiting factors that keep individuals from adhering to exercise and these include, money (access), time and motivation (extrinsic and intrinsic). Without the support from others and some form of self-efficacy many people feel lost, stuck and never find a program that fits their own interests. This presentation will provide the recourses needed to help hold individuals accountable with their fitness and will not take any extra time out of their day. If individuals have the accessibility, motivation and time built into their day to train with a personal trainer during their work day at work. Then they will ultimately be able to adhere to an exercise program specific to their own needs and provide greater coverage on their health care. Adhering to exercise and having the access of a personal trainer in a structured work environment can overall lead to greater health and wellbeing.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:55am - 11:15am
034 Karpen Hall

10:55am

Breaking Racial Barriers: Black Student-Athletes In Western North Carolina High Schools In The 1960’s
The 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision mandated the integration of public spaces. This paper examines the integration of specific high school athletic programs in Western North Carolina. Stephens-Lee High School and Lee Edwards High School merged into the integrated Asheville High School in 1969. Prior to the merging of these two segregated schools, Stephens-Lee, an all black high school, and Lee Edwards, a predominately white high school, segregated not only their students, but also their sports. Before the creation of Asheville High School, Brevard High School achieved full integration, becoming the first integrated team to win a state championship in 1963-1964. This study examines the individual experiences and accomplishments of black high school athletes who attended these four Western North Carolina high schools using oral histories, yearbooks, newspaper articles, and high school records. Furthermore, this study analyzes the varied and individualized experiences black athletes had while attending the schools under examination, demonstrating each athlete’s distinctive experience. These individualized experiences contribute to the discussion of sports integration.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:55am - 11:15am
014 Whiteside Hall

10:55am

Dialog Of Communication
Society exists as a complex network of roles, stereotypes, and interactions. This is an analytical and theoretical study of three particular roles in society as identified in the communication field. Previous theories have presented one to all three of these different roles in their own realms, and discuss how they might interact. They are the viewer, the communicator, and the artist. This is where this paper begins. By comparing and contrasting these roles as they interact and overlap each other a dialog is generated, producing a detailed image of society. The viewer, classified under the title of ‘consumer’ or ‘audience’, makes up the majority of society. Communicators are the representatives in media who are charged with the task to provided information and/or truth. Finally, the artist, similar to the communicator, speaks to the public by relating to emotional and utilizing symbols. Through content analysis of media and artistic theories the paper discussion centers around sectional individuality and functionality and how the sections interact. The critical thinking point: how society is represented through such lenses as stereotypes, agenda setting, and criticism.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:55am - 11:15am
012 Karpen Hall

10:55am

Social Media Listening Paper For The National Physical Education Institute Conference
The National Physical Education & School Sport Institute has used social media to connect and reach physical education teachers from all over the world. The NPESSI decided to use Twitter as well as Facebook to see how social media was utilized to its advantages and to see what can be improved in the future.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:55am - 11:15am
016 Karpen Hall

10:55am

The Role Of Contemplative Practice In The Study Of Social Justice: Practical Applications For Cultivating Compassion And Resiliency
As the world faces increasingly complex and interconnected issues, such as climate change and poverty, it is imperative to cultivate a wholehearted response to suffering that results in more than sentiment, but in real acts of care based on a firm commitment to social justice. As college students develop the capacity for deeper intellectual understanding combined with a broader sense of social responsibility, they must be equally encouraged to embolden their sense of compassion for self and other grounded in resilience to persevere in the face of what can seem to be intractable problems. In looking for concrete practices that lend to creating a fuller ability to navigate responses to social suffering more skillfully, we can look to contemplative practices applied in the realm of End-of-Life Care. Drawing on Buddhist meditation techniques such as Tonglen and Bearing Witness, as well as an “epistemology of love” as developed by Arthur Zajonc, students can develop an enhanced philosophy of care that combines the wisdom of the heart with intellectual knowledge. Through deep listening, mindfulness, and the recognition of our common humanity and interdependence, students can learn to manifest an enduring presence while actively participating in the creation of sustainable long-term work committed to social change.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:55am - 11:15am
237 Zageir Hall

11:15am

Using Molecular Genetics To Identify Unknown Species Of Hexastylis (Heartleaf)
The federally threatened genus Hexastylis (Aristolochiaceae) has recently undergone a taxonomic revision and has been separated from the genus Asarum (wild ginger). Approximately 12 species have been described within this genus, but they are difficult to differentiate based on morphology alone. Recently, 16 polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed to distinguish among species, including H. naniflora, H. minor, and H. heterophylla. The Botanical Gardens at UNC Asheville asked us to assess the identity of 11 Hexastylis individuals in their collection. A QIAGEN Plant Mini Kit was used to extract DNA from each of the 11 Hexastylis leaf samples. PCR amplification and gel electrophoresis was then used to analyze and compare DNA fragment sizes at each of 15 microsatellite loci. These results will allow us to give the Botanical Gardens at UNC Asheville more accurate information on the species they have so they can better educate people about these federally threatened species and help conserve and protect the plants they have.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 11:15am - 11:35am
038 Karpen Hall

11:15am

Time4Baby
Pediatricians, hospitals, and state healthcare agencies recommend tracking newborn care data. Upon having our second daughter, I realized how time-consuming and cumbersome it is to record feedings and diaper changes. Documenting the baby’s care distracted us from our primary responsibility, taking care of the baby. The Time4Baby web app, built on a MEAN (MongoDB, Express.js, AngularJS, and Node.js) stack, enables its users to quickly track their baby’s relevant statistics. Diaper change and feeding data are logged and accessible for later viewing and printing. To ensure the app was a success, new parents tested the app and provided feedback on its usability.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 11:15am - 11:35am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

11:15am

Do Perceptions Of Undergraduate Experience Influence The Decision To Attend Graduate School? - A Case Study Of UNC Asheville Alumni
Using data from surveys completed by UNC Alumni, this research examines whether or not a relationship exists between the perceptions of undergraduate experience and the decision to attend graduate school. The purpose of this research is to explore a deeper understanding of the undergraduate experience and how it relates to future study. Several variables are used in the model, such as a composite undergraduate perception score related to research experience, career preparation, and satisfaction with overall education. Other variables considered in the model are graduation year, gender, race, internship participation, and academic division (natural sciences, humanities, or social sciences). Using SAS, a logistic regression model was developed in order to determine the effect of the aforementioned variables. Results indicate that a unit increase in undergraduate perception score (p=0.0021) and majoring within the humanities (p=0.0092) significantly increases the odds that an alumnus will attend graduate school. Furthermore, the odds of attending graduate school for a major within the humanities were 2.368 times the odds for the natural sciences and 1.78 times the odds for the social sciences. The odds of attending graduate school for majors within the social sciences were 1.306 times the odds for the natural sciences. This information could potentially benefit students, faculty, and administration by contributing to a deeper understanding in regards to helping students achieve their goals for the future.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 11:15am - 11:35am
035 Karpen Hall

11:15am

The Characterization Of Henry Lightcap In Edward Abbey's Novel 'The Fool's Progress'
This project examines the characterization of Henry Lightcap in Edward Abbey’s novel The Fool’s Progress by attending not merely to Abbey’s environmental activism but also his interest in philosophy. His written testimonies and the observations of biographers since his death have affirmed that Abbey was mostly inspired by his passion for wilderness preservation and his collegiate studies of various philosophies. The plot of The Fool’s Progress centers on Henry Lightcap, a middle-aged man who shares many of Abbey’s own sentiments and experiences, and who embarks on a cross-country road trip back to his hometown, revisiting significant memories of his youth along the way. It is obvious, to the reader, that Henry’s actions often contradict his ideals, but it is not so obvious that the dualisms of his emotions and intellect act as catalysts for his character development. This study considers the possibility that the narrator, Lightcap, embodies the contradictions of American ideology versus the actualities of American ‘progress’.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 11:15am - 11:35am
232 Karpen Hall

11:15am

Wilderness Therapy Programs As Prescribed Medicine For Struggled Individuals
Alternative therapy programs such as Wilderness therapy for treating substance abuse has challenged standard medical treatment-protocols. The format and design of Wilderness therapy programs revolve around the professional therapist integrating their practices with outdoor therapy and recreational activities that intentionally expose clients, and arguably the experts as well, on all the dimensions of wellness, which are: physical, emotional, intellectual, occupational, social, spiritual, and environmental. This multi-dimensional approach yields profound results for the clients, the families, and experts, and researchers. What is outstanding is that these methods apply to everyone, whether you are suffering from a mental illness to needing to change up stagnant lifestyles and seek purpose. Wilderness therapy programs naturally break down the barriers in social interconnectedness, teamwork, and present mindfulness engagement with activities and lectures in place. Exposures to Wilderness therapy practices gives the client a locus of control in their being, and prompts them an opportunity to educate and rediscover themselves, and build enough self-efficacy to willingly choose healthy behaviors in their lifestyle. We have loss this essential fabric in America, clearly, look who is running for president. This environment, along with an integrated curriculum to maximize an individual’s wellness, reaps an holistic approach, that is also sustainable (ex: using outdoors and simple activities for treatment, effective and financially reasonable). I urge these programs to be available, and even prescribed in the future, to not just the struggled or ill individuals, but to all members of the community who want to endure new challenges.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 11:15am - 11:35am
034 Karpen Hall

11:15am

Uses And Gratifications Theory And 'Non-Traditional' News And Media
According to various polls, the majority of Americans receive their news from the television, while young people tend to receive their news elsewhere. Given that many college-aged Americans do not own a television set, using streaming services such as Netflix and Hulu, which are void of any “traditional” news broadcasts, this investigation delves into where these people get their news. Examining what media we use and how people use media, as opposed to what media does to people, through the Uses and Gratifications Theory of mass communication I intend on clarifying how individuals using non-traditional sources for their news, are subject to agenda setting from multiple sources.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 11:15am - 11:35am
012 Karpen Hall

11:15am

Whitewashed America: An Exploration Of Identity In American College Students
Whiteness in America is often represented and experienced as a norm. The normalization of whiteness both perpetuates the marginalization of racial and ethnic minorities in the U.S., and also enables white Americans to leave their own racial and ethnic identities unexamined. This study explores the question of whether and how white American college students perceive connections among their racial, ethnic, and national identities. A series of in depth interviews explores how students understand various aspects of their identities such as racial, ethnic, national, and religious, and which of these identities, may be seen as connected or overlapping. Preliminary analysis using a grounded theory approach reveals themes of Protestant Christianity as a norm, whiteness as both invisible and privileged, and the collegiate experience as significant in forming understandings of race and identity.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 11:15am - 11:35am
237 Zageir Hall

11:35am

The Identification Of Hybridization Between Red Wolves And Coyotes
The Western North Carolina Nature Center (WNC-NC) offers a rehabilitative habitat for animals that are endemic to the Southern Appalachians. The facility is home to two male and two female red wolves (Canis rufus), an endangered canid. However, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Red Wolf Recovery program, and the WNC-NC recognize that red wolves and coyotes (Canis latrans) can interbreed. The objective of our research was to determine if the WNC-NC red wolves are purebred or if they have hybridized with coyotes. Using molecular genetic testing is imperative, since using phenotype to identify hybrids can be ambiguous. After obtaining fur samples, we extracted total DNA from hair roots. PCR was used to test mitochondrial and y-DNA loci, and the products were visualized via gel electrophoresis imaging. Regions corresponding to the Y-chromosomal microsatellites and CYTB gene of mtDNA were amplified and sent off for sequencing. Both sequences were annotated using BLAST and compared to existing red wolf and coyote sequences on GenBank to determine the amount of hybridization. With our results, we hope to clarify the true maternal and paternal lineages of the red wolves. From there, the WNC-NC may or may not have to update their environmental licenses, as they could be housing an endangered pure bred red wolf.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 11:35am - 11:55am
038 Karpen Hall

11:35am

Ashdeals
Too many times I have gone to a restaurant to enjoy a meal, only to find out that if I had come on a different day I would have saved money. According to FoodTechConnect.com, “78 percent of restaurant operators consider daily deals to be effective in increasing revenue for their restaurants”, yet in Asheville most places do not advertise their deals online. Ashdeals is a data-driven website that allows users to search Asheville’s weekly food and beverage deals with different keywords. Organizing the data by day allows users to search for deals on a specific day across the city. Ashdeals was iteratively tested and refined based on user feedback.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 11:35am - 11:55am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

11:35am

Disenfranchisement And Displacement: American Migration And The Search For The American Dream In John Steinbeck's 'The Grapes of Wrath'
A writer of twenty-seven novels published between 1929 and 1961, John Steinbeck based many of his works on his childhood experiences growing up in the quiet town of Salinas, California. Many of his stories focus on social and economic issues, drawing on themes such as roles in family and community, companionship, and the pursuit of happiness. In the third novel of his Dust Bowl Trilogy, The Grapes of Wrath (1939), Steinbeck chronicles the lives of the fictional Joad family after they have been uprooted and disenfranchised due to the effects of the economic and environmental tragedies known as the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl. With no other choice but to migrate west toward California from their home in Oklahoma, the Joads experience various struggles such as illnesses, deaths, and the abandonment of various members of their family. The American Dream is represented as a symbol to the Joads as they strive toward a better future for themselves; however, by the end of the novel, there is little evidence that the family will ever achieve such a dream. In my project I argue that, while often times the American Dream is thought to consist of external materialistic ideals, Steinbeck depicts it as a sense of internal hope for each of his characters.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 11:35am - 11:55am
232 Karpen Hall

11:35am

The Power Of Muscle: Resistance Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Type 2 diabetes (T2D), characterized by insulin resistance, has now reached epidemic proportions worldwide. While aerobic endurance training (AET) has long been recommended as an intervention for T2D, research shows that resistance exercise offers a viable alternative that may be more feasible for some people. The purpose of this project is to review information from randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and other scientific articles regarding the effects of resistance training on factors associated with T2D. This will include reviews of information on the pathogenesis of T2D, historical developments in the understanding of the disease, and studies concerning AET’s affects on metabolic processes. However, the effect of muscle contraction on glucose transport and other metabolic pathways will be the main focus of this research. Consideration will be given to dose-response relationships, the role of relative muscle mass, and other findings related to the subject. Studies of various possible mediators of contraction-induced signaling mechanisms in muscle will be included along with current articles regarding epigenetics.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 11:35am - 11:55am
034 Karpen Hall

11:35am

Content Analysis Of White Collar Crimes Versus Common Crimes
This research examines descriptions of white collar criminals in comparison to common criminals using the same publication, The New York Times. Content Analysis is used to examine the adjectives and phrases used when describing three notorious white collar criminals; Bernie Madoff, Frank Abagnale Jr, and Jordan Belfort in comparison to the descriptions used to describe three common criminals. This study examines how factors such as race and socioeconomic status could potentially influence how the way the Media chooses to portray different criminals. The analysis of the adjectives and phrases used to describe white collar criminals paints them in a more favorable light, with descriptions suggesting they are more intelligent, cunning, and successful, therefore, become celebrated in popular media because of it. An analysis is then conducted to see if the difference in the media’s portrayals of different perpetrators influence the public’s opinion and their attitudes about those who commit crimes.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 11:35am - 11:55am
012 Karpen Hall

11:35am

Customer Treatment In Retail Settings: The Influence Of Perceived Race And Class
Sales clerks who inaccurately perceive customers can lead to consumer racial profiling, discriminatory behaviors, and microaggression toward customers. Prior research indicates that prejudgment of customers based on appearance and preconceived assumptions of race and class continue to be a crucial issue specifically in retail settings. The purpose of this study is to observe the interaction between customers and sales clerks to determine the type of treatment customers receive based on perceived race and class. Perceived age and gender of customers are also variables that can cause differential treatment. This study uses participant-observation to explore differential treatment of customers in various retail settings such as outlet malls, traditional malls and downtown shopping centers. Thirty-two retail establishments were selected for observation to maximize variation on dimensions such as target clientele. Initial analyses suggest that customers who are white are highly favored over customers who are nonwhite, and that white males engage in microaggressions more frequently than do other sales clerks.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 11:35am - 11:55am
237 Zageir Hall

11:55am

Healthful Eating on College Campuses
Weight gain on college campuses is on a steady increase, and evidence has shown that extreme stress leads to overeating. Food as a means of comfort is a coping mechanism for college students; however, this strategy leads to unwanted weight gain and subsequent negative body image emotions. Stress often leads to unhealthy food choices, and binge eating junk food results in feelings of depression, guilt, and discouragement. A healthy relationship between food and emotion must be restored on college campuses. Females are more likely than males to use comfort foods to combat depression and stress, as well as voice body image concerns. Target audiences for interventions should be tailored to meet the specific emotions of both sexes because college men and women view food so differently. It’s important to instill values of healthy eating now because rates of obesity are reaching staggering heights across America. If universities could introduce mindful eating to students, a positive relationship between food and emotion could be restored.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 11:55am - 12:15pm
034 Karpen Hall

12:00pm

Chemical Characterization of Hyder Pasture
A chemical characterization of water and soil from the newly restored Hyder Pasture fen in Flat Rock, North Carolina was obtained. This represents the first assay performed on the site since the restoration. Little data was available from pre-restoration analysis for comparison. However, what was available was compared to this study to investigate any observable changes. Several methodologies were utilized in order to ascertain prominent chemical features of the system supporting a population of endangered bunched arrowhead (Sagittaria fasciculate). Water samples were analyzed by HP-LC Ion Exchange to determine what nutrients were present in various bodies of water at the site. Soil samples were analyzed by standard CEC procedures to determine the nutrients and potential productivity of the soil after the restoration. Soil organic carbon was determined by the Loss on Ignition(LOI) method. Scanning Electron Microscopy with EDS was employed in order to qualitatively determine the mineralogy of the soil. The scope of this study was to add to the growing body of work aimed at understanding the requirements of sustainable bunched arrowhead populations. Currently, little research is available to aid in predicting the success of wetland restorations focused on revitalizing or protecting these rare plants. The results were compared to previous work from separate sites containing bunched arrowhead done by previous researchers in order to determine any commonalities among chemical features.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 12:00pm - 12:40pm
014 Zeis Hall

12:15pm

Concussions and Sport
The incidence of concussions as a result of participation in sporting events is staggering. This is a health issue that is in need of increased exploration and focus due to high risk of implications that occur later on in life for those who experience a high number of mild concussions, and low number of severe concussions. In this presentation I hope to provide an overview of current knowledge regarding head injuries related to participation in sporting events, specifically concussions.  I will review the causes, issues, and current strategies that are geared towards solving this issue, as well as discuss a potential future study to gain more insight on what can be done to combat the increasing prevalence of concussions.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 12:15pm - 12:35pm
034 Karpen Hall

12:40pm

The stability of Glucuronidated Phthalate Metabolites at Various pH’s
Phthalates, found in many household products, have been shown to have a significant impact on human health. In particular, phthalates have been shown to be disruptive to the hormone testosterone. Disruption of testosterone during pregnancy is known to cause a variety of birth defects in male infants including: decreased anogenital distance, as well as, size and function of male reproductive organs. We hypothesize human variability factors, such as, gender, race, smoking status, and age lead to differential risk from phthalate exposure. We seek to understand the effect of varying pH values on the stability of phthalate metabolites in human urine, which can range from 4.5-8.0. This knowledge will improve our understanding of the stability of these compounds. We will also acquire an understanding of the extent to which phthalates may be studied to gain insight into the variation of human susceptibility. The urine samples were analyzed after thawing and then again after altercation of pH and temperature. Urine samples were purified through solid phase extraction and by high performance liquid chromatography. Samples were analyzed with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 12:40pm - 1:20pm
014 Zeis Hall

1:00pm

Constructing Community: The Performance Art Of Laurie Anderson
The contemporary artist Laurie Anderson is a Renaissance woman who has taught, written monologues, recorded albums, produced movies, and travelled around the world playing electronic concerts as well as self-produced narrative performance art and orchestral pieces. Anderson has been active since the 1960s, drawing inspiration from sources as varied as Moby Dick, John Cage, her Christian upbringing and her current Buddhist practice. This paper will discuss the evolution of Laurie Anderson’s work, influences, collaborators, predecessors, and will explain the significance of the interconnected web of human relation that her creations inhabit and permeate. Her performances such as United States, Letters to Jack, Home of the Brave, and Duets on Ice focus on personal stories that illuminate binaries of the shared and internal human experience. Bridging the gap between mainstream and avant-garde Anderson is able to address and reinforce the significance of community and human relation. Community is defined as two or more people who feel a sense of fellowship with one another, not necessarily caused by geographical, ethical, or political affiliation. Laurie Anderson’s ability to concisely express complex emotions that make-up the chemistry of community and relationship is a result of balancing and fluidly integrating all of the forces in her performances during the editing process, and prioritizing the power and spirituality of fellowship. The paper analyzes the purpose of her work through scholarly sources, first-hand live and recorded observations of performances, and archival documentation. Anderson focuses on communication, multi- sensory stimulation and education in order to connect with people from all backgrounds in a genuine manner.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:00pm - 1:20pm
237 Owen Hall

1:00pm

Nigerian Dwarf Goat Breed Purity Using Genetic Markers
The Western North Carolina Nature Center speculate that two of their goats, with unknown origins, are of Nigerian Dwarf species descent. Fur samples from the unknown breeds, as well as two known breeds of goats, were provided by the WNC Nature Center in order to assess the origins of the speculated Nigerian Dwarf goats. Two known goat breeds were analyzed and used as an outgroup: Angora goats, domestic, wool-producers and Oberhasli goats, a modern American breed of dairy goat originating from Switzerland. DNA was extracted from fur samples, followed by PCR amplification of ten microsatellite loci, and analysis of genetic distances between the sample and outgroup populations were conducted. Comparative analysis of microsatellite markers was used to determine the likely origins of a local population of Nigerian Dwarf goats.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:00pm - 1:20pm
038 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

Cattle Drive: Making Trade Easier
Cattle Drive helps farmers sell and buy cattle and helps butchers, restaurants, and stores find local beef easily. The app will give prospective farmers a place to explore and find a starting point in developing their herd. Users will be able to see recently posted animals as well as have the ability to find the animals corresponding farm on the map. When posting an animal the user will enter data that includes farm name, price range, breed, and address of the farm. My motivation comes from seeing how farmers interact and how technology is essentially nonexistent within the trade as well as the dwindling number of farmers down 3.1% from 2007 to 2012 according to the USDA. The lack of technology costs the farmer time and money, it is especially costly for the small farmer. Cattle drive is a useable iPhone app for the general public. I used Xcode for the majority of my development. My hometown farming association helped with testing.

Moderators
Speakers

Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:00pm - 1:20pm
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

1:00pm

“O Lost”: Thomas Wolfe’s Journey To Consciousness And Truth Through The Narrative Distance In Look Homeward, Angel
Thomas Wolfe’s Look Homeward, Angel is an autobiographical bildungsroman that follows the story of the protagonist, Eugene Gant, and confronts the difficult aspects of growing up in a broken home. Wolfe felt increasingly isolated and alone because of his alcoholic father and distant mother; those feelings of isolation grew after the death of his cherished brother. In his search for Truth, in which he exposes the fascinating force of consciousness and the human mind, Wolfe is stuck in between three voices–his own, the narrator’s and Eugene’s. Scholars such as Richard Walser and Bernard DeVoto mistake these competing voices as a unified one, which has obscured the academic conversation about the clear narrative distance in Look Homeward, Angel. I posit that as the novel progresses, Eugene gains more experience as he grows older and closer to the narrator and becomes more conscious. As time proceeds, the Truth becomes perspicuous to Eugene as he evolves into a man of knowledge. Eugene’s journey through life represents his search for consciousness and Truth that were once lost as he emerged from his mother’s womb. As Eugene moves closer to the narrator, he gains consciousness and Truth while the narrative distance almost completely diminishes.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:00pm - 1:20pm
232 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

A Critique of Beyonce's 'Lemonade' and Contemporary R&B At Large
My presentation will be covering and episode from my podcast Pablo's Corner. The episode is entitled "A Critique of Beyonce's 'Lemonade' and Contemporary R&B At Large" and is a pre-produced, hour long segment recorded for Dr. Mark West's Radio Production course in the mass communications department. In the episode my guest and I explore contemporary R&B's mainstream feminism and contrast it with the more working class-oriented feminism of late 90's/early 2000's R&B. I will briefly cover the material, stylistic choices made and technical work involved in producing my show throughout my presentation.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:00pm - 1:20pm
016 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

War Photography And The Consequences Of Image Reality
War photography is a special breed of photography that shows us a harsher reality and flaws of the human condition. This study looks at the period of war photography starting with World War II until the first Iraqi War through a western-centric view and the changes it has undergone. Using historical research and content analysis of Susan Sontag’s book, Regarding the Pain of Others, photographing wars will be dissected on a moral plane to confront the growing issues. While American public opinion on wars and the use of censorship heavily influences the images shown to the public, the reality of war is being transformed and convoluted, creating new ethical and social dilemmas.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:00pm - 1:20pm
012 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

Gendered Messages In US Health Advertisements
Gendered social norms are commonly reinforced through multiple forms of media. Analyzing how gendered media representations connect to gendered health behaviors remains an underexamined but fruitful line of research. Past studies have shown that US women are much more likely to seek medical help and are also more likely to take drugs and medications when compared to men. More research is needed to explain the role of advertising in this process. This study undertakes a content analysis of magazine health advertisements, and assesses their gendered components. The sample includes ten of the twenty most circulated magazines of 2016. Preliminary analyses reveal almost all drug and medication advertisements included a female or portrayed feminine expressions, whereas advertisements very rarely contain males or masculine expressions. The lack of male presence in US magazine health advertisements may be a partial explanation for the unequal usage of drugs and medications.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:00pm - 1:20pm
237 Zageir Hall

1:20pm

Kim Kardashian And The Interruption Of The Male Gaze In The Historic Female Self Portraits Of The Countess de Castiglione
Due to technical restrictions in the developing years of the camera and other photographic equipment, landscapes and still-lives were the preferred style. It was easier to take a long exposure and still get a crisp image of a still landscape than of a person, as people tend to move. Advancements, such as the invention of the first portrait lens in 1840, made portraiture the style to envy. Having a photographic portrait taken was not only a cheaper alternative to sitting for a painted portrait and took significantly less time, it eventually became reproducible. When photographic technology became widely accessible as a result of the unpatented wet-collodion process, self portraits became a way for people to visualize their own impressions of themselves, and immortalize those impressions. Self portraits by women are particularly intriguing because of the way they are able to interrupt the male gaze simply by acting as both viewer and viewed. By looking at disruptions of the male gaze in the self-directed portraits from the 19th century Countess of Castiglione and comparing them to the mirror selfies of 21st century Kim Kardashian, this paper will examine the way cultural continuity helps us understand so-called vanity as a means to the personal reclamation of the female body.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:20pm - 1:40pm
237 Owen Hall

1:20pm

Using Fecal DNA Extracts To Determine The Relatedness Of Two North American River Otters (Lontra Canadensis)
Inbreeding can have negative effects on a population, as it increases the risk of passing on mutated or harmful alleles and decreases genetic diversity. Conservation efforts for captive species or threatened populations are usually aimed at increasing heterozygosity by discouraging inbred progeny. Such efforts are currently underway at the Western North Carolina Nature Center in Asheville, NC, which houses a male and a female river otter (Lontra canadensis). However, the relatedness of the two otters is unknown and breeding is only worth pursuing if the two otters are not genetically identical. Fecal samples were used as a means of DNA extraction in order to noninvasively determine the genetic background of the otters. DNA was successfully purified and isolated in both the male (12.8 ng/μL) and female (4.9 ng/µL) fecal samples and mitochondrial DNA was amplified via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were then sequenced and compared using BLAST from GenBank. The identity score from GenBank can be used to determine an acceptable level of relatedness between the otters to allow them to breed and produce diverse offspring.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:20pm - 1:40pm
038 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

Team Development Of Model View Controller Software In The Unity 3D Engine
This long-term, ongoing project seeks to teach software design principles to undergraduate participants by designing and implementing multi-user software inspired by board games. Our talented, interdisciplinary team of computer scientists, artists, and designers aims to integrate a wide range of pedagogical domains into the project, such as object oriented software engineering, UML diagrams for design documentation, version control techniques, human computer interaction and aesthetic design principles, as well as socket-based peer-to-peer networking. The software is written in C# using the Unity engine.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:20pm - 1:40pm
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

1:20pm

“Outside It Is Raining Blood, And You Have Absolutely Nowhere To Go:” Colonialist Attitudes Towards Female Bodies In Dolores Prida’s Beautiful Senoritas And Coser y Cantar
This project examines two works by twentieth-century Cuban-American playwright Dolores Prida, Beautiful Senoritas (1977), and Coser y cantar (1981). Violence is at the center of both of these plays and infects the public and private lives of Prida’s female characters. The descriptions and language associated with Prida’s female characters ties their suffering to the violence of colonization. This violence creates a constrictive and oppressive atmosphere in which the women are trapped. However, rather than confront these structures, the women respond by instead internalizing and perpetuating colonialist attitudes amongst themselves. Prida therefore ties the suffering of her female characters to the problematic dichotomy of colonialism, in which one is either an abuser or abused. This projects posits that through the character of “The Girl” and the moments of harmony within Ella/She, Prida suggests that the solution to female suffering is to transcend the language of domination through multiculturalism and radical imagination.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:20pm - 1:40pm
232 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

Gendered Media: A Content Analysis Of Esquire, Cosmopolitan, And Vanity Fair
The purpose of this research is to examine claims made by Dr. Michael Kimmel regarding whether different media platforms are as he argued gendered and minimalize women. This investigation examines if gendered media platforms were more gendered during the time of Dr. Kimmel’s claim, 2000, or if media platforms are less gendered today. In order to determine this claim, this research looks at magazine advertisements of Esquire, Cosmopolitan, and Vanity Fair. The advertisements being examined are advertisements taken from the above magazines issued during 2000 and 2016 magazine issues. Two coders were asked to review the provided advertisements and the results were determined. This research offers useful information as to whether or not media platforms have continued to reinforce gendered biases by examining specific magazines that have been categorized as male, female, and cultural or neutral.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:20pm - 1:40pm
012 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

Single Moms In College
The WZUP single Moms in College episode shed light on some of the things that single parents endure while pursuing a secondary education. In this episode, I sat down with two single moms who broke down some of the challenges they face, as they attend school and raise children. I will also discuss some of the features and techniques I used to prepare my show. I will also speak on the preparation, planning, and writing and research in getting my show ready to be published.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:20pm - 1:40pm
016 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

“Hillbilly” Stereotypes In Appalachian Early And Middle Childhood Literature
Early and middle childhood is an integral time for the development and ability to identify and classify stereotypes. Into middle childhood the ability to identify stereotypes evolves into a complex multi-dimensional classification system. Past research has examined the perpetuation of racial and gendered stereotypes in children’s books, and explored the implications of these dynamics. This study seeks to identify patterns in the representation of another stigmatized group - the “hillbilly” - in children’s picture books that are set in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. The Southern Appalachian Mountains are home to a diverse people, culture, and resources. With the emergence of industry in America, the local color movement, and the “idea of Appalachia” stereotypes surrounding mountain people were solidified, including the “hillbilly” stereotype that is still present in American culture today. Using a coding scheme that captures key elements of traditional hillbilly-role stereotypes, the author undertakes a content analysis of literature for early and middle childhood, published after 1960. Early findings suggest that in some of the books being analyzed there are representations of the “hillbilly” stereotype.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:20pm - 1:40pm
237 Zageir Hall

1:20pm

Synthesis and antibiotic evaluation of heterocyclic A and C ring depsidone analogs
Depsidones, which are 6,7,6-fused tricyclic natural products, are potent inhibitors of Gram-positive bacteria, with MIC values ranging from 0.1–8.0 μg/mL. This work looks to evaluate the effects of substituting the A and C benzene rings of the natural products with a variety of heterocycles on their antibacterial activity. Synthesis and optimization of pyridine, furan, and thiophene depsidone analogs has been accomplished through a 4-step synthetic sequence beginning from the corresponding 2-bromo-3-carboxylic acid heterocycles. After benzyl protection of the carboxylic acids (82-95% yield) is achieved, the central 7 membered ring of each depsidone analog is produced by first coupling to catechol through a copper catalyzed etherification (7-19% yield), deprotection the benzyl ester, and closing the ring through an intramolecular esterification. Each analog will be tested in an antibacterial bioassay against Staphylococcus aureus to reveal how the changes in the electronic profile affect antibiotic activity.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:20pm - 2:00pm
014 Zeis Hall

1:40pm

Environmental Landscapes: The Role Of Birds In The Works Of Charles-François Daubigny
Barbizon School artist Charles-François Daubigny’s landscape compositions depict various species of living birds within their native habitats. While there is significant scholarship on the artist, the role of birds in his works has not been studied. This paper argues that Daubigny’s works represent bird species in a primary role in the landscape, while concurrently suggesting a new genre of ornithological art. The artist portrayed birds in an environmental and active manner, emphasizing the importance of the natural habitat to the avian species. In the larger context of Western art history, birds had been depicted in a mostly symbolic manner, which did not recognize them as individual animals apart from their relations to humans. With the rise of the Enlightenment, natural philosophers and ornithological artists began representing birds in a scientific, unbiased manner. However, as visual analyses elucidate, Daubigny’s style differs from theirs because he depicted the birds’ surrounding habitat to a larger degree, enabling the viewer to understand the crucial symbiotic relationship birds have with their environment. Paintings such as A River Landscape with Storks (1864) in the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Moonrise (1877) in the Brooklyn Museum contain identifiable species of water birds performing their daily or nightly routines. By describing the birds as living organisms inhabiting an ecosystem, rather than as specimens or symbols, the artist stressed their ecological roles. While Daubigny’s landscapes still fulfill a primarily artistic rather than scientific role, they are based on observation, and are therefore truthful recordings of bird species and their environments.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:40pm - 2:00pm
237 Owen Hall

1:40pm

Determining The Origin Of A Recently Discovered Local Population Of Rosyside Dace (Clinostomus Funduloides)
The rosyside dace (Clinostomus funduloides) is a common minnow in headwaters and streams throughout the eastern United States, including most of the Appalachian region. This species, however, has only recently been found in local headwaters of the Upper French Broad River basin. It is unknown whether this population was evolutionarily isolated from the nearby Catawba River basin, or if the species has recently arrived as a result of human activity, such as bait bucket introduction. To answer this question, we first isolated DNA from livers and muscles of fish collected in the Upper French Broad and Catawba headwaters. We then PCR-amplified the cytochrome-b gene, a highly conserved region of mitochondrial DNA, for each specimen. Next, we sequenced PCR products, then compared sequences via GenBank BLAST to determine percent similarity between regions. Given that the Upper French Broad population is a recent discovery despite a consistent history of regional wildlife surveys, we expect that DNA comparison will provide evidence that the species was recently introduced by translocation of fish from the Catawba or another nearby river system. This is the first known study of the Upper French Broad rosyside dace population, and will provide valuable data supporting regional wildlife surveys and conservation efforts.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:40pm - 2:00pm
038 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

Computational Aesthetics
In the developing field of computational aesthetics, researchers examine and define how machines judge beauty and creativity in a manner similar to humans. The universal indicators of beauty have been studied in numerous fields and through various methods. One psychological theory of attractiveness proposes that humans find average faces to be highly attractive. This theory has dated back to the late 1800’s during which Sir Francis Galton noted composites of faces to be more attractive than their individual components. We incorporate the theory of “average is attractive” in our ongoing attempts to numerically measure attractiveness of three-dimensional face models. Specifically, we investigate if we can determine attractiveness using Blanz and Vetter’s mathematical model of faces, which abstracts each face as a point in a multi-dimensional vector space with the origin as the average face. The axes of the facial point space are determined by a statistical analysis of a dataset containing approximately 200 faces. As implemented in the FaceGen modelling software package, each face is conceptualized as a point associated with 130 facial features involving both shape and texture. Using this representation and the hypothesis that attractive faces cluster together in vector space, we implemented an attractiveness measure by computing proximity to a parameter that we label as a “known” attractive face. In this presentation, we compare and discuss the results of this proximity algorithm with the human evaluations we receive from our aesthetics survey. Faculty and students evaluated 24 three-dimensional models which are split into four overlapping subgroups of 12 faces. We are presenting initial analysis of our results, including correlation between the judgement of individual raters.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:40pm - 2:00pm
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

1:40pm

Reclaiming Insanity: A Study Of Charlotte Perkins Gilman's “The Yellow Wallpaper”
This paper considers the possibility that the wallpaper in Charlotte Perkins Gilman's short story "The Yellow Wallpaper" is a physical manifestation of the narrator’s depression. The narrator, a young married mother, begins to spiral out of control when she is prescribed the rest cure, a treatment composed of isolation from stimulation and absolutely no productive work. The culmination of the narrator's mental illness occurs when she succumbs to insanity, a symbolic suicide of sorts as she disassociates herself from her life and even her identity. Gilman, who experienced postpartum depression of her own, later explained that she wrote the story in 1892 to "keep people from being driven crazy." By attending to Gilman’s purpose, this project claims that "The Yellow Wallpaper" offers a powerful testimony to the period’s treatment of women and its stigma concerning mental illness.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:40pm - 2:00pm
232 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

Diversity Representation In Television: Implications For Consumer-Media Relationships
As America expands in diversity, popular entertainment media have gradually begun to reflect the nation’s demographic evolutions more realistically and inclusively, moving away from past trends of invisibility or visibility only through oppressive stereotypes. Modern comedy and drama programming still references stereotypes, but increasingly, controlling images of the past are used to make critical statements about, or poke fun at, those who still believe them. This comparative analysis surveys racial-minority representation in American situational comedy shows and serial dramas from the 1950s to the present, modelled upon the framework analysis Deo, Lee, Chin, Milman and Yuen apply to Asian-American and Pacific Islanders on television. Deo, et al., survey amount of visibility; the nature of character roles and what such roles imply; how America’s history of immigrant oppression shaped stereotypes; and how stereotyped portrayals influence harmful public and internalized attitudes concerning all minority demographics in society. Consumers look to television programs for entertainment and to escape from what may be harsh lived realities, while media producers rely upon consumer interest and support in order to exist and to thrive. This relationship is best accomplished and most effective when an atmosphere of trust and credibility, rather than perpetuated discrimination, exists between modern media and consumers.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:40pm - 2:00pm
012 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

Political Rhetoric And Representation: Obama’s Advocacy For Women
The ways that politicians represent identity groups while in office can both reflect and affect public attitudes about those groups, particularly when high level leaders are involved. This research considers how government officials represent marginalized groups, in particular, women. It looks in depth at President Obama’s rhetoric about women while in the Oval Office, both to national and international audiences. Specifically, the study uses content analysis to investigate patterns in President Obama’s annual State of the Union addresses and United Nations General assembly addresses. While data analysis is ongoing, preliminary patterns indicate that while in the Oval Office, President Obama’s representation of women tends to lean emphasized women’s empowerment at home and in the workforce.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 1:40pm - 2:00pm
237 Zageir Hall

2:00pm

Parturition in Big Brown Bats (Eptesicus fuscus)
This project examined parturition behavior in a maternity colony of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) in western North Carolina. The colony roosted between the outer slats and inner screen of an attic window, which provided a 2-dimensional surface upon which the bats roosted and enabled non-invasive video recording of behavior. Births occurred the first week of June. Females in labor often spaced themselves apart from the main aggregate of the colony. In the preparatory phase of parturition, bats rotated to hang inverted (by the thumbs) so the pup would be caught in the uropatagium. A significant period of obvious, strong contractions preceded expulsion of the pups. Characteristic of vespertillionids, presentation was breech (feet-first). There was a long and apparently difficult period between initial appearance of the feet of the pup and its final delivery. Females regularly licked themselves and occasionally pulled at the pup to facilitate delivery. Females in labor also often interacted with other females, both in aggressive encounters and in interactions that may suggest midwife-like behavior. Both twin (most commonly), single births and one instance of triplets were observed. Cleaning of the newborn and attachment to the teat followed expulsion. Time spent in all phases of parturition was highly variable

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 2:00pm - 2:20pm
038 Karpen Hall

2:00pm

Women Through The Lens Of Luis Buñuel
Luis Buñuel, the renowned filmmaker of the 1900s, is known primarily for the Surrealism that permeates much of his filmography. His films often make a commentary on politics, Catholicism, and/or the bourgeoisie, all topics that are important to Buñuel as a person and as a Surrealist. It can also be argued that Buñuel may be criticizing the patriarchy with his somewhat outlandish and potentially parodying portrayal of women. However, upon further consideration of Buñuel’s work, which contains recurrent and damaging representations of women, this assessment seems simplistic, or at least incomplete. Analysis of Buñuel’s films leaves one wondering whether he is truly criticizing the patriarchy or rather contributing to the patriarchy, albeit possibly with good intentions. In this presentation, Buñuel's films Un Chien Andalou, El ángel exterminador, Susana, Viridiana, Belle de Jour, and Cet obscur objet du désir are analyzed thoroughly and presented as examples of his depiction of women and sexual desire. Quotes from Buñuel himself, testimonies from acquaintances of his, and further explorations of the time period, however, seek to show the ambiguity presented in those films: are they a criticism of the times, or are they actual proof of Buñuel’s misogynistic views?

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 2:00pm - 2:20pm
237 Owen Hall

2:00pm

The Fuzz Factory Podcast
An overview about the weekly podcast, as well as editing techniques and music and topic choices.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 2:00pm - 2:20pm
016 Karpen Hall

2:00pm

United States News Coverage Of Islam In Election Years Post-9/11
In a 2015 report, Racheline Maltese discussed a content analysis of three United States television news programs. Maltese made the claim that following September 11, 2001, the United States news media was more likely to generate news reports focused on Islam during American presidential election years than during non-election years. Since Islam has a significant population in the United States of America and has grown substantially since September 11, 2001, this study will examine previous literature on this topic and discuss why research on Islamic news coverage is important. In this study, United States print news media will be given a content analysis in order to determine whether or not Islam is discussed more often during American presidential election years than during non-election years. In addition, due to claims presented in previous studies in this topic that the rise in news coverage of Islam in Western news media during election years is due to an increase in reader demand, Google web searches and news searches will also be examined. The potential correlation that these trends have with the status of Islamic news coverage will be observed and determined.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 2:00pm - 2:20pm
012 Karpen Hall

2:00pm

Taking A Knee: Exploring Colin Kaepernick’s Protest
American sports events are known for the tradition of the national anthem be played before a sporting event as symbolic beginning of sports enjoyment. The tradition has now been shaken, as Colin Kaepernick has created a discussion into what is allowed during this national anthem. As he has produced a conversation of who is allowed to speak on social issues and what do we as a society consider acceptable behavior from athletes during the anthem. This descriptive research explored how National Football League (NFL) players, coaches, owners and fans used Twitter to discuss the kneeling and other forms of protest by Colin Kaepernick and other players during the national anthem. Specifically, a context analysis of many tweets and video responses to the protest among different constituencies (other athletes, coaches, owners, and fans), reveals the mixed reactions of those who either oppose or approve of the form of protest or the involvement with social issues around racial oppression. There was often questions of patriotism and even a discussion around the form of the protest and its platform.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 2:00pm - 2:20pm
237 Zageir Hall

2:00pm

Instrumental analysis of biologicals from natural water sources

The French Broad River (FBR) serves as the home to several endangered species, raising concern due to the possible presence of endocrine-active compounds (EAC). EACs in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent have shown to affect stages of sexual development in several aquatic species. In collaboration with the French Broad Riverkeeper Hartwell Carson, and supervised by Dr. John Brock, we will quantify the EAC concentration in WWTP effluent in Asheville, NC. Research has shown that exposure to EACs in WWTP effluent has induced the feminization of fathead minnows, in Ontario, Canada, resulting in a decline of fertilization success; continued decline could lead to extinction (Kidd et al. 2007). EACs have not been measured in the FBR, and we are the first to produce results for EACs. Endocrine-active compounds likely to be found in the FBR include: phthalates, estrogen, bisphenol a (BPA), and nonylphenols (NP). Currently, we have successfully detected multiple phthalate metabolites though the use of a Shimadzu Liquid Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer-8040 (LCMS). Phthalates are used in many personal care products (PCP), and we hypothesize that the amount of phthalates being released from WWTP effluent can be associated with the time of day. Considering PCPs are commonly used in the mornings and before going to bed, we suggest that there may be a spike in concentration at those times. Upon completion of the EAC analysis, the information acquired will describe the effectiveness of WWTP processes in removal of EACs, and increase awareness in the community for environmental sustainability.

 


Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 2:00pm - 2:40pm
014 Zeis Hall

2:20pm

On The Virtue Of Women: Aspasia And Diotima
In the works of Socrates’ disciples two women are presented exceptionally; Aspasia, famed courtesan and lover of Pericles from Miletus, and Diotima, a priestess from Mantinea of Arcadia. Both characters are represented as teachers of Socrates, an individual hailed as a progenitor of Western philosophy. This representation of women is a striking difference from how ancient Athenian society often depicts women, as a threat to men, or less than men in respect to intellect, physical strength, and attractiveness. I will explore why these women are represented as teachers of Socrates in Plato’s Menexenus and Symposium, and in Xenophon’s Symposium and Memorabilia; and I shall examine whether they possess “aretê,” the ideal of Socratic philosophy. Given that both of these characters were foreigners in Athens and in social positions outside of the family, I also consider what example these two characters could serve for the women of ancient Athens, and whether or not women could attain “aretê” by following the Socratic tradition. However, due to the stigmatization of these two characters, with Aspasia being a courtesan and Diotima being a foreigner, I propose that the characters of Aspasia and Diotima reveal positive Socratic assumptions about the potential for women’s virtue but are undermined by the models of virtue established for women by Athenian tradition.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 2:20pm - 2:40pm
237 Owen Hall

2:20pm

Representation Of The Youth Generation In Rolling Stone Magazine Covers
The publisher of Rolling Stone Magazine, Jann Wenner, called himself “the spokesman” for the youth of America. 1968 was an extremely influential year for cultural and social change. The purpose of this research is to show how Rolling Stone magazine covers represented the youth generation during 1968. I analyzed the Rolling Stone magazine covers and cover stories from the year 1968 and categorized the topics found. Sex, drugs and rock n roll appeared most often on the cover, therefore reflecting the social and cultural changes happening during that decade. The Rolling Stone magazine covers from the year 1968 strongly predict the values and priorities of the youth generation of America during that time.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 2:20pm - 2:40pm
012 Karpen Hall

2:20pm

Welcome to Clip Talk
Clip talk is a podcast that covers topics of multimedia design, video editing, and everything else in between. Created by Mass Communication major, Hamish Horton, this presentation will break down the show from pre-production, production, and post-production.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 2:20pm - 2:40pm
016 Karpen Hall

2:20pm

An Examination Of Queer Homeless Youth And The Organizations That Serve Them
A concerning trend has risen in the social realm of homelessness. There is a steady increase in the number of LGBT-identifying homeless youth on the streets. According to the Williams Institute, forty percent of American homeless youth served by agencies identify as queer. In contrast, according to the Center for American Progress ten to twenty percent of American youth identify as queer in the general population, so this overrepresentation of LGBT+ youth living on the street is quite apparent. Parents and legal guardians are displacing queer youth from their homes and these youth are being forced to survive independent of stable role models or structured support systems. This paper focuses on the efforts of the nonprofit organizations Time Out Youth in Charlotte, North Carolina, and Youth OutRight in Asheville, North Carolina. By conducting four interviews with people in leadership in various queer oriented organizations across the South and analyzing the commonalities between the organizations, and identifying the gaps in assistance that still exist, this paper demonstrates the need for more research and action surrounding this issue. Interviews with these professionals who work with queer youth show that there is an overrepresentation of LGBT-identified youth on the streets and that there must be more specialized shelters and assistance available for these youth. This project addresses the question: does educating the community through the efforts of nonprofit organizations lead to the creation of safer spaces for queer homeless youth?

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 2:20pm - 2:40pm
237 Zageir Hall

2:40pm

Natural Dibenz[b,f]oxepin Compound as a Potential Novel Antibacterial Agent: Synthesis, Evaluation, and Optimization of Empetroxepin A and B

The increase in multi-drug resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria has made the issue of bacterial resistance a global health concern. New classes of antibacterial drug compounds, able to work outside existing mechanisms of resistance, are needed to combat these infections. Natural product-based drug discovery is an effective method in the development of new classes of antibiotics due to the chemically unique structures characteristic of naturally occurring compounds. This study aims to develop a viable antibacterial drug using Empetroxepin A and B, novel dibenz[b,f]oxepin natural products, as the lead compounds. The natural products will be synthesized in seven steps from commercially available 3,4,5-trimethoxytoluene. To date, the first five steps have been completed successfully through a Wittig olefination of trimethylsilane-protected salicyladlehyde with the phosphonium salt generated from the toluene starting material. The desired phosphonium salt was synthesized through aromatic bromination and radical benzylic bromination of the starting material. High yields (68-99%) have been achieved on large scales for each of these steps. Hydrogenation of the alkene bridge formed by the Wittig olefination has also been completed though only low yields have been obtained to date. The remaining steps in the total synthesis include a copper oxide catalyzed etherification ring closure followed by selective deprotection of the methoxy substituents to give both Empetroxepin isomers A and B. Once the synthesis of the lead compounds has been completed, the synthetic route will be used to develop analogs for structure activity relationship studies to optimize the natural product’s antibacterial activity.


Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 2:40pm - 3:20pm
014 Zeis Hall

2:45pm

Socrates Sowing The Seeds Of Environmental Philosophy
I will argue that Socrates planted the seeds for later philosophers on environmentalism. In Plato’s Phaedrus, Socrates denies interest in the natural world by stating “I am a lover of knowledge, and the men who dwell in the city are my teachers, and not the trees or the country.” However, a closer look in Plato’s other works reveals Socrates studying the role of the natural world in the life of humans. I will argue that Plato’s apparent aversion to Socrates’ interest in nature is in response to Aristophanes’ The Clouds and the prejudice claims against him in the Plato's Apology of Socrates. I will study Plato’s Apology of Socrates, Republic, and Timaeus. The Timaeus reveals that Plato does write about the natural world’s effect on the life of humans. While Plato includes Socrates in this dialogue he does not make him the main speaker on humans’ relationship with the natural world. Contemporary environmentalism is not evident in the Socratics, including Plato. However early thoughts from Socrates and Plato reveal how both of them believe humans today, should live in balance with nature.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 2:45pm - 3:05pm
237 Owen Hall

2:45pm

Cult Radio
“Cult Radio” is a pre-produced hour-long, interview-format podcast by Mass Communications major Lindsay Miller (under advisor Mark West). The general podcast deals with exploring pop culture phenomenons that have managed to gather a unique fan following throughout history. The episode I will be presenting deals with the ‘cult’ of One Direction, a boy-band from the UK. I interviewed a fan of the group and asked her about what it is like to be a fan as well as what drew her to them in the first place. In my presentation, I will talk about how I came to the idea of “Cult Radio,” as well as the choices I made in scripting, audio, and editing while creating this particular podcast.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 2:45pm - 3:05pm
016 Karpen Hall

2:45pm

Literary Journalism: Content Analysis Of New Journalism
This paper explores the New Journalism movement throughout history to the present day. The project uses a content analysis to discover trends among writing techniques of New Journalists. It defines indicators of the literary genres of fiction and nonfiction and addresses which genre’s indicators occur most frequently in work agreed upon universally as New Journalism. The goal is to understand where this subgenre of journalism falls in relation to traditional journalism. Furthermore, it will explore the cultural connotations of journalism as literature rather than objective reporting.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 2:45pm - 3:05pm
012 Karpen Hall

2:45pm

I Could Be Yellow
Through the combination of queer theory, personal narrative and performance art, this original solo performance explores the concepts of non-binary identities and performative gender.

Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 2:45pm - 4:15pm
Carol Belk Theatre

3:05pm

Tracing A Socratic Legacy Through Albert Camus' “Myth of Sisyphus”
Albert Camus was well-acquainted with the major philosophers of the Classical world, and many of his works testify to his infatuation with ancient Greece. But little work has been done to trace the Classical origins of his philosophical reasoning. In what ways could the writings of Albert Camus have been influenced by the legacy of one of the foundational figures of western philosophy, Socrates? How does the Socratic tradition manifest itself in Camus’ theory of the Absurd? For this study, I will look primarily at Camus’ 1942 essay, The Myth of Sisyphus, in which his theory of the Absurd is most clearly illustrated. This essay, in conjunction with Plato’s Socratic writings including the Apology, Phaedrus, and Symposium, as well as other Socratic sources from Antiquity, will allow me to demonstrate the extent to which Camus, however inadvertently, became part of a clear Socratic tradition in philosophy. The Myth of Sisyphus contains clear traces of Socratic reasoning. Though Camus and Socrates may diverge on the ultimate result of philosophical inquiry, many of Socrates’ methodologies and attitudes are echoed in Camus’ writing, including but not limited to a strong desire for the “awakening” of a critical consciousness, a preoccupation with the human rather than the metaphysical or cosmological, and a conception of human wisdom as a knowing-of-not-knowing. This positions him on a long line of modern and ancient thinkers who were both directly and indirectly influenced by Socrates and his methods, which were revolutionary in their time.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 3:05pm - 3:25pm
237 Owen Hall

3:05pm

Radio As An American Medium During World War II
During World World II, the radio was a novel form of receiving wartime information within American households. Initially a way to consume entertainment, the radio also became a central hub for immediate pertinent information concerning American World War II efforts. Newly released information was first regurgitated through the radio, which acted as a central nervous system to American society during times of stress in the early 1940s. Families would gather around the radio several times a day to hear the news broadcasts concerning the ramifications of the war. This research paper serves to explore the implications radio had as the first mass-produced electronic medium America used to disseminate wartime information. The differing types of rhetoric and tone used during radio broadcasts concerning the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the announcement of armistice will be analyzed to determine how broadcasting emotion through an electronic medium has in its ability to influence the emotional reaction of a participating audience.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 3:05pm - 3:25pm
012 Karpen Hall

3:05pm

“Sorority Life With Vanessa Jones:” A Radio Show
“Sorority Life with Vanessa Jones” is a pre-produced hour-long, interview-format radio show which deals with why students choose to join sororities on a small Southern college campus where Greek life is only now becoming established. The show talks about how UNC-Asheville's sororities are different than those at most other colleges in the nation, with a larger focus on service in the community and in the Asheville area as a whole. In my presentation, I will talk about the choices that I made in recording, writing and producing this radio show, including decisions concerning audio, scripting, and editing aspects of the show.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 3:05pm - 3:25pm
016 Karpen Hall

3:20pm

Combretastatin A-4 Analog Bearing Indole Chalcone Moiety
Drugs that target tubulin polymerization have largely been focused on in the field of cancer research. Combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) binds to the colchicine site of ß-tubulin, and therefore inhibits tubulin polymerization. Inhibiting this function leads to cell aptosis in tumoral vasculature, thus producing anti-cancer effects. Structural modifications of CA-4 have been made in various studies to increase the solubility of the compound, as well as binding affinity to the colchicine site. Studies in the literature have shown that incorporating indole and chalcone moiety in analogs of CA-4 has increased the efficacy of the drug. This research focuses on synthesizing an analog of CA-4 in which the trimethoxy A-ring of CA-4 is replaced with an indole ring, and possesses a chalcone core that connects the two heterocyclic rings. Synthesis of the substituted indole utilizes Hemetsberger-Knittel methodology, in which thermolysis of the vinyl azide allows the indole ring to form. The chalcone of interest is formed in the final step from the indole aldehyde and halogenated acetophenone. The brominated acetophenone was synthesized several times in order to acquire enough product so that it could be purified through column chromatography. Various reactions with a previous student's indole aldehyde were attempted, but the trials proved to be unsuccessful. Therefore, the indole synthesis was started from step 1 in order to obtain the desired indole product. So far, a protecting group has been added to a substituted benzaldehyde, which is required for the rest of the synthetic scheme. The indole synthesis needs to be completed so that the desired indole can be reacted with the brominated acetophenone, thus forming the target CA-4 analog.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 3:20pm - 4:00pm
014 Zeis Hall

3:25pm

Artifacts and Entropy
Objects follow a trajectory through time from creation to obsoleteness. This is seen in both the loss of ideas and functions attached to an object and the erosion and decay of the original object. How can an understanding of the gradual loss of information over time be used to encourage the viewer to create their own stories and emotional attachments from pieces of art?

Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 3:25pm - 3:45pm
237 Owen Hall

3:25pm

Dichotomy Of Media Coverage On The Affordable Care Act
In 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Affordable Care Act into law in order to reform the current status of healthcare for low-income citizens. However, from the start, the Obama Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services faced major setbacks in the progress of the Act. Once the Act was finally passed, the website was rendered nearly inaccessible due to crashing and being confusing to the users. Even after the Act was enacted, many congressmen and women refused to show support and attempted to repeal it, failing each time. The public relations representatives of the Obama Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services have continuously attempted to minimize the damage caused by the major setbacks by the faulty website, the claims from various parties that it is harmful to the economy, etc. Basic rules of public relations have them handling the issues as they appear, but trying to limit talk of what went wrong. Journalists, however, must get to the meat of a story, meaning they must address the issues as they arise and keep talking about them. Public relations representatives required the use of news stories and journalists in order to, essentially, advertise their cause, but journalists are interested in every detail of the story, not just the pretty, pre-packaged ones, and journalists are still covering the issues facing the Affordable Care Act and questioning the methods of those in charge of the reform.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 3:25pm - 3:45pm
012 Karpen Hall

3:45pm

In a Perfect World: the Use of Social Media Within the Age of Anxiety
ome users of social media find it necessary to portray a “perfect world” persona online, adding stress from the need to create the perfect profile and profile picture on applications such as Facebook and Instagram. Body image issues also arise from the pressure to appear perfect on the Internet, sometimes causing eating disorders, depression, and anxiety. Cyber bullying is also a negative affect of social media use. People believe they can emotionally abuse fellow users without any consideration for their mental health. Cyber bullies also feel the need to portray a perfect persona by belittling others, ultimately hindering others’ perception of their selves and their self-worth. Online dating applications have replaced casual, interpersonal dating with a shallow approach to images of beauty and perfection. Users feel the need to create a perfect dating profile and image, ultimately creating a resume for a partner in hopes to attract their ideal mate. Via research methods such as content analysis, as well as quantitative research, this idea is explored.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 3:45pm - 4:05pm
012 Karpen Hall

4:00pm

A Computational Study of Substituent Effects on the Thioallylic Rearrangement Pathway'
This goal of this study was to find the transition state structures and threshold energies of the thioallylic rearrangement mechanism, while observing the effects of different substituents. The initial structure is as follows: R-S-CH2CH=CR2, where the R groups represent different substituents. The substituents were chosen based upon electron donating (R= -NH2; -OCH3), electron withdrawing (R= -CF3), and steric properties (R= isopropyl; benzene) and were tested in a number of combinations on the three possible R positions. The transition state was found to be a short-lived sulfur bridge between the first and third carbon of the structure, resulting in the final state with the sulfur on the third carbon and a shift of the double bond to the first and second carbon (CH2=CHCR2-S-R). The specific energies found for the original thioallylic structure (R1=H; R4=CH3) were 48.0 kcal mol­-1 for the trans orientation and 48.4 kcal mol-1 for the cis orientation. Oxyallylic structures underwent the same calculations to compare the effect of oxygen versus sulfur in the rearrangement. Oxyallylic threshold energy values were 61.1 kcal mol-1 and 61.8 kcal mol-1 for the trans and cis isomers, respectively. The computational methods used in this study include Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to find transition state energies and mechanisms, as well as the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) as a model to visualize electron localization and densities in the described structures. Though this research was purely computational, the results are important to synthetic chemistry and biology. That said, there have been biological and biomedical studies that have found garlic derived organosulfur compounds to have capabilities to inhibit cell proliferation, and act in metabolic processes to aid in the treatment or management of certain diseases. Providing preliminary results on this system can be a beneficial starting point for the research and synthesis of compounds involving the thioallyl.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 4:00pm - 4:40pm
014 Zeis Hall

5:00pm

Radical Empathy and Other Liberal Arts Life Lessons
I was working at UNC Asheville recruiting students through the Office of Admissions when I first began the Master of the Liberal Arts and Sciences program.  UNC Asheville’s main selling point is that it is a public liberal arts university, a private school feel for a public school price.  Before that job, I had no idea what the liberal arts were and had to google the term in anticipation of my interview.  My undergraduate university had general education, but I mainly spent my four years in the same building with the same group of people.  Any good recruiter knows that stories are the key to winning people over to your cause.  Facts and statistics are icing on the cake, but the stories are what people remember.  Because I had no liberal arts stories of my own, I used those of my coworkers when convincing students of why a liberal arts education was not only preferable, but essential.  Now that I have completed a graduate degree in the liberal arts, I am happy to share my own stories and the lessons that the liberal arts have taught me through three papers that showcase my intellectual journey.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 5:00pm - 5:15pm
Karpen Hall-Laurel Forum

5:15pm

A Journey Through the Liberal Arts and Sciences
My intellectual journey through the Masters of Liberal Arts and Sciences (MLAS) program at The University of North Carolina Asheville (UNCA) has been nothing short of a transformational catalyst in my academic and individual growth as a person. I entered the MLAS program in the fall of 2014, after obtaining an undergraduate B.S. degree in Environmental Studies from UNCA in the spring of the same year.  I was originally attracted to the program from hearing about the certificate in Climate Change Science and Society, giving way to a desire to see what the rest of the program could offer me. I was enticed by the diversity of the program and the wide variety of course content. The courses available were about subjects that I found to be very important and relevant in this world as well as subjects that I have never even thought about diving into, some of which I took the leap. In the MLAS program I was able to further my knowledge of subject matter I studied in undergrad, as well as venture into many other subjects that broadened my understanding and knowledge of the liberal arts and sciences.  I took courses varying from climate change science, poetry, European history, creative writing about documentary photography, environmental management, collective impact and public health, and analyzing young adult fiction novels. The interdisciplinary nature of the program challenged every ounce of my being and gave me the opportunity to think in ways that I never thought possible.

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 5:15pm - 5:30pm
Karpen Hall-Laurel Forum

5:30pm

Black Mountain Memories – Poems and Images of Black Mountain College
Black Mountain College was a vibrant collection of creatives who made a pilgrimage to North Carolina from 1933 to 1957. The college was an experiment in approaching learning through experience. Instructors came from diverse backgrounds which fed the artistic community of the college, most notably the Bauhaus, which dissolved in 1933 during the rise of the Nazi regime. The experiential learning techniques and collaborative processes have interested me most in studying Black Mountain College that path has influenced my Capstone project. My project uses the ekphrastic poetic form, responding to my personal photography collection made at the Lake Eden and Robert E Lee campuses, the former locations of Black Mountain College. This technique will lend itself to the experiential rooting of the college itself and demonstrates the educational vision that faded into history and recognizes markers in time that are symbols of moments that have experienced trauma, as in the case of the scholarly European refugees who were invited to Black Mountain to teach. The images also will speak to the enormous amount to creative energy that came out of the small community of students and their instructors. The former Black Mountain College campuses hold a time capsule of photographic and poetic energy that have translated effectively into a body of work that speaks across disciplines

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Karpen Hall-Laurel Forum

6:00pm

Not Available
Not Available

Moderators
Speakers
Sponsors

Tuesday December 6, 2016 6:00pm - 6:30pm
Karpen Hall-Laurel Forum