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Economics [clear filter]
Tuesday, December 6
 

8:00am

Response To The Impacts Of Climate Change On Hawaiian Food Systems
Food production in Hawaii does not have the capacity to supply the state’s growing demand for nutrients. The discrepancy between demand and local production is so vast that Hawaii imports 92% of all the food consumed by residents and visitors of the islands. In conjunction with Hawaii’s globalized trade economy, the environmental limits on local food production generate regionally specific consequences. Oceanic transportation is a key factor influencing food prices and accessibility. The cost of transporting perishable food will increase with the global mean temperature, and supply will be disrupted by the increased frequency of extreme weather events. Climate change will not only interrupt supply chains, it will also damage agricultural and trade infrastructure. Both the private and public sector will experience rising costs associated with adapting Hawaii’s food system to the changing environment. Government spending will be necessary to renovate the state’s ten major harbors in anticipation of rising sea levels. Looking forward, the focus of the response should be to fortify infrastructure and promote local food production. Tax incentives to subsidize the production of nutritious food staples can promote the agricultural sector and local sales. Hawaiian food production will improve the state’s food resiliency and ability to respond to supply shocks. Although the cost of trade is increasing, food importation cannot be discontinued any time soon. In order to feed Hawaii’s residents, local food production must be heavily supplemented by importation. The true cost that must be considered is food accessibility for the people of Hawaii.

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Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:20am
035 Karpen Hall

8:20am

Hospital Costs And Competition: An Empirical Analysis And Review
The United States healthcare economy continues to be a lightning rod for social and political reform with spiraling costs exceeding the capabilities of customers and insurers alike. Recent literature and legislation suggests that diminishing competition within the industry may be a factor in price escalation. This econometric analysis focuses on the assumption of a competitive marketplace which should exhibit conventional price behavior characteristics in variable environments of supply and demand. However, the data does not exhibit the model of either a purely competitive nor a monopolistic economy. With several possible shortcomings evident in the proposed model for analyzing hospital competition, this paper also suggests elements within the marketplace that alter its competitive chemistry into a payer-driven non-monopsony.

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Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
035 Karpen Hall

8:40am

A Case Study Of Perceptions Of US Income Inequality
The goal of this project was to elicit subjects’ perceptions regarding income inequality and evaluate what factors may influence the subjects’ perception. In order to elicit this relationship, the subjects are asked to complete a demographic survey, then asked to distribute 100 pennies, either physically into a graph or numerically into a table. The subjects’ penny data is used to construct a Lorenz curve and calculate a Gini coefficient. The Gini coefficient will be compared to the actual coefficient for the United States and the deviation between the elicited and the actual Gini coefficient calculated. Finally, this deviation and the demographic data will be analyzed using multivariable regression to determine if patterns exist between demographic characteristics and perceptions of income inequality.

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Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
035 Karpen Hall

9:00am

An Econometric Analysis Of The United States’ Trade Embargo On Cuba: Projections And Implications Using The Gravity Model
The Gravity Model is an econometric model designed to predict the expectation of trade flows between trade partners based on the size of their respective economies and the geographic distance between them. This paper seeks to determine what the economies of the United States and Cuba, specifically in terms of trade imbalance, US imports, and US exports, would look like if the United States lifted the embargo and what growth may be expected if and when the embargo is ends.

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Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:20am
035 Karpen Hall

9:20am

A Fundamental Analysis Of The Sherwin Williams Company
This project asks the question, Is Sherwin Williams stock a good buy? This project uses fundamental analysis to answer to answer this question. Fundamental analysis forecasts future cash flows and future discount rates in order to calculate what is called the firm's intrinsic value. The intrinsic value of a firm is the present value of the firm’s anticipates future cash flows. If the current price per share is below the current intrinsic value, an investor can profit from buying the company's stock. This project uses economic, industry, and company analysis to calculate Sherwin Williams intrinsic value, and make a decision to buy or to sell.

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Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:20am - 9:40am
035 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Industrial Hemp: Economic Challenges And Opportunities For The United States
Industrial hemp is used for rope, carpet, brake linings, automotive body parts, shoes, fabrics, paper, cardboard, cement, wallboard, fuel, lubricants, soap, shampoo, cosmetics, food products, and many many other consumer products in the U.S.; however, most of these are made from imported hemp due to the fact that industrial hemp is illegal to produce according to federal law. Section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 allows for state by state pilot research proposals; many states have since enacted laws to establish hemp production and research programs in various forms. The resulting emerging market for industrial hemp is quickly evolving and unique. There are few products that state legislation allows for while remaining illegal at a federal level. This project examines the emerging hemp market in the United States. Particular attention is given to the nature of the markets for the various final products and uses for industrial hemp, the number of buyers and sellers, the presence or absence of barriers to entry, pricing, and state and federal policies the influence the market. The uncertainty presented by the federal-state policy disconnect creates significant barriers to the expansion of industrial hemp production in the United States.

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Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:40am - 10:00am
035 Karpen Hall

10:15am

The Golden State’s Moment: A Critical Examination of California’s Cap-and-Trade Design, Implementation, and Lessons
The purpose of this research paper is to evaluate the efficacy of and propose reforms to California’s cap-and-trade policy for carbon emissions. This carbon pricing scheme is a landmark economic policy in the fight against anthropogenic climate change. We look at policy design options implemented over the history of cap-and-trade policy at the state, regional, federal, and international levels, and derive best practices. We then evaluate California’s cap-and-trade policy based upon these lessons, detailing by which metrics the policy design is sound, and by which metrics it could be improved to ensure economic efficiency and political feasibility. We find that California’s cap-and-trade system successfully limits transaction costs and allows banking, but is hindered by low certainty, a too-low emissions cap, and uncertain use of revenue, resulting in political instability. To the extent that California remedies this issues, the state’s cap-and-trade program figures to prove economically and politically viable to a greater extent, which will increase the likelihood of carbon pricing implementation in the United States and abroad.

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Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 10:35am
035 Karpen Hall

10:35am

Economics Of Cornbread
This project looks at the change in published cornbread recipes during the period in which the southern Appalachians industrialized. Published cookbooks were used to establish changes in foodways, and data from the University of Virginia demonstrated the rise in industrial output as a proportion of the region’s economy. The rise of industry and the wages associated with it, led to an increase in the opportunity costs of preparing meals using home-produced ingredients. When people chose to work outside the home, the foodways shifted. For example, shortening took the place of lard in cornbread and biscuits, and macaroni and cheese became popular.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:35am - 10:55am
035 Karpen Hall

10:55am

The Craft Brewery Scene In Asheville, NC: Key Factors In Its Growth And What Can We Expect In The Coming Years?
Craft Brewing has been growing at a rapid rate throughout the United States in recent years. Some places have seen more rapid growth than the national average when measuring by breweries per capita, up to 6 times as much. This paper analyses what factors contribute to craft brewery growth in these cities that exceed the average and are epicenters of the craft beer movement, such as Asheville, North Carolina. Data from Portland, ME; Grand Rapids, MI; Asheville, NC is examined from the years 2001 to 2015 using a regression model to identify key factors in growth. The results show that tourism, age, and population have the largest impact on the number of craft breweries in these cities. Using this model, the future growth of Asheville’s craft beer industry was also predicted. A time series model was used to forecast each independent variable to be input into the regression model. From this it is predicted that in 2020 Asheville will have 32 breweries in its metropolitan statistical area. This information will help brewers understand the market they are operating in and the benefit of targeting tourist.

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Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:55am - 11:15am
035 Karpen Hall

11:15am

Do Perceptions Of Undergraduate Experience Influence The Decision To Attend Graduate School? - A Case Study Of UNC Asheville Alumni
Using data from surveys completed by UNC Alumni, this research examines whether or not a relationship exists between the perceptions of undergraduate experience and the decision to attend graduate school. The purpose of this research is to explore a deeper understanding of the undergraduate experience and how it relates to future study. Several variables are used in the model, such as a composite undergraduate perception score related to research experience, career preparation, and satisfaction with overall education. Other variables considered in the model are graduation year, gender, race, internship participation, and academic division (natural sciences, humanities, or social sciences). Using SAS, a logistic regression model was developed in order to determine the effect of the aforementioned variables. Results indicate that a unit increase in undergraduate perception score (p=0.0021) and majoring within the humanities (p=0.0092) significantly increases the odds that an alumnus will attend graduate school. Furthermore, the odds of attending graduate school for a major within the humanities were 2.368 times the odds for the natural sciences and 1.78 times the odds for the social sciences. The odds of attending graduate school for majors within the social sciences were 1.306 times the odds for the natural sciences. This information could potentially benefit students, faculty, and administration by contributing to a deeper understanding in regards to helping students achieve their goals for the future.

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Tuesday December 6, 2016 11:15am - 11:35am
035 Karpen Hall