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Music [clear filter]
Tuesday, December 6
 

8:00am

Music of Memory in the City of Refugees: Intersections of Syrian and Greek Music in Contemporary Thessaloniki.

Following the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire and the formation of a new Turkish state after the first World War, Greece received roughly a million Greek refugees from Turkey. The signing of the Lausanne Treaty in 1923 caused a further 250,000 Greeks from Turkey to be relocated to Greece as part of a compulsory population exchange facilitated between the two states. Many of these refugees were resettled in Thessaloniki and the surrounding areas of Macedonia. At present, the city once again has a refugee presence due to hostile conditions in parts of the Middle East and other areas of the world. A substantial portion of the current refugee population is Syrian. Through the use of music, both Greek and Arabic, connections between the past and present are being constructed by musicians in Thessaloniki for the purpose of deconstructing and reducing cultural and national borders and barriers between Greeks and Syrians. These connections are primarily made through use of a shared culture of music, as well as history, that specifically draws on the Greek refugee past of the 1920s.  


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Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:00am - 8:20am
018 Lipinsky Hall

8:20am

Aphex Twin, Blank Banshee, And The Modern Sonata Form
Sonata form has proven time and time again to be a foundational form that can be used to analyze countless classical compositions. The theory of the form certainly has stood the test of time when it comes to classical music. This form does not necessarily apply only to music of the classical genre however. The form prevails even today in modern electronic compositions. In this presentation, I will be analyzing several electronic compositions that I believe could be analyzed as having a sonata form. I will use the theory of sonata form analysis as put forward by such theorists as Hepokoski and Darcy, Caplin, and Cook. The pieces I will analyze are electronic compositions that utilize no samples, and are relatively harmonically complex. I will analyze three pieces from disparate subgenres of electronic music to show that this form applies to more than just one obscure subgenre of this field of music. Sonata form, as will be discussed, is not just a cookie-cutter mold that material must be fit in to follow a strict set of rules. For these pieces, I will not only discuss how they follow a sonata form structure, but also how this structure is used in the pieces. By the end, I will show that sonata form is used today just as much as it has been in the past, and indeed applies to much more than just the music of the past.

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Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:20am - 8:40am
018 Lipinsky Hall

8:40am

Reinterpretation Of A Classical Form
Tchaikovsky’s fourth symphony is an extraordinary example of the classical application of the sonata form. I will explain how the abnormally prolonged exposition section is foreshadowed by the immediate presence of phrase extension and loosening techniques beginning with the initial introduction of the first theme. I will compare the composition to standard compositional techniques as explained by music theorist William Caplin. The movement structurally adheres to 3 part sonata form but, deviates with unpredictable tonal centers. The primary theme modulates to a remote area, not the dominant as expected. As is typical for sonatas, the memorable ‘fate’ theme is brought back a number of times during different sections of the movement, voiced by different instruments. Tchaikovsky’s symphonic voicing allows for the restatement of phrases in such a way that new interpretations can be made. Analysts and commentators have gathered information from the composer’s life during the composition of the fourth that give context to the dramatic work.

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Tuesday December 6, 2016 8:40am - 9:00am
018 Lipinsky Hall

9:00am

The Hidden Usage Of Sonata Form In The First Movement Of Stravinsky’s Petrushka: The Shrovetide Fair
Sonata form is a common musical form that developed in the Classical period of music history and continues to stand as one of the most influential forms recognized in the musical community today. I want to take this form and apply it to a piece that seemingly does not follow this form to the inexperienced eye, but in actuality does. In this paper I will uncover the unlikely possibility of the twentieth century composer, Igor Stravinsky, using sonata form in one of his most renowned ballets. Igor Stravinsky is famous for the works Firebird Suite (re-popularized by Fantasia 2000) and Rite of Spring (a ballet that caused riots due to its unusual rhythms and chords), but his typically forgotten ballet is Petrushka, written in 1910. Petrushka is divided into four movements and I will analyze the first, The Shrovetide Fair, and use a well-known Haydn symphony as a basis for my comparisons to sonata form. I find this movement fascinating in the fact it seems to be organized chaos. The Shrovetide Fair is a movement full of various polyrhythms and random time signature changes that would seem to represent the chaotic nature of a festival in 1800s Russia. I will peel through this chaos and explain the underlying organization into sonata form using music theorist William E. Caplin’s sonata analysis techniques, because there are clear divisions of sections that prove there is an organizational pattern that Stravinsky did not make obvious.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:00am - 9:20am
018 Lipinsky Hall

9:20am

Games of Silence and Surprise: Comedy in the Symphonies of Haydn
The use of compositional techniques to imbue music with comedic elements was not atypical in the common practice era, but recognizing the jokes that were being told requires careful scrutiny due to the temporal and cultural divide that separates modern listeners from the experience of the great composers. In particular, Joseph Haydn made elaborate use of techniques such as comedic text, deviation from convention, musical parody, incongruency, and titling to emphasize humorous aspects of musical storytelling. The effects of these techniques on the trained listener are many, but frequently focus on a betrayal of conventional expectation with the express purpose of making light of the tradition and practices, or making referential jokes that could be readily understood in the era.
The salience of these jokes has diminished with age, but is still ripe for appreciation if a listener knows when and how to hear them. One must inculcate oneself into the conventional styling and techniques of the associated era of a piece if they are to hear it as it was meant to be heard at the time of its conception. Using Leonard B. Meyer’s implicational theory along with Enrique Alberto Arias’ hierarchy of comedic techniques in tonal music, this paper will explore the comedic nuances present in Haydn’s Symphony No. 80 in D Minor, and comment on the effect of these techniques on modern listeners in comparison to listeners contemporaneous to the composer.

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Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:20am - 9:40am
018 Lipinsky Hall

9:40am

Marquee Moon: The New Wave Sonata
The New York City music scene of the early 1970s was an exciting one: the influence of the no-wave music was heavy, and punk wasn’t too far away. In 1974 the band Television secured a residency at one of the most influential clubs in New York, CBGB’s, and was placed into the foreground of the new wave movement. After recording their first single independently, Television received a deal with Elektra Records and recorded their debut album Marquee Moon (1977). The title track is a staggering composition/improvisation that runs for almost eleven minutes, and despite punk music’s rebellious nature, this piece arguably follows one of the most traditional forms of classical music, sonata form. Typically when such a well formed and complete model for musical form exists, there is a tendency to place this category in isolation; either a piece of music empirically conforms or it does not. However, aspects of sonata form translate to other genres more readily than one might think, for example, one of the most prominent elements of sonata form is the presence of two contrasting melodies, what could be considered in pop music to be the verse and chorus. In the case of “Marquee Moon” there are many elements that link it closely with sonata form and others that separate it. Using Ken Stephenson’s What to Listen for in Rock, as well as materials by Hepokoski and Darcy, and William Caplin this paper aims to analyze this coexistence of form and disarray.

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Tuesday December 6, 2016 9:40am - 10:00am
018 Lipinsky Hall

10:00am

Keepin' It in the Groove - A Study of Contemporary Fusion

Music critic and social theorist Simon Frith’s (1996) examination of genre provides a framework to examine how genres may emerge discursively from contemporary society more widely.  I use this framework to examine the relationship between contemporary composition and performance, specifically in Contemporary Fusion, and how the audience’s perception of this performative relationship affects the way in which they define the music and thereby come to define themselves. The emergent genre that I call “Contemporary Fusion” (CF)—a set of compositional and performative practices with a potential lineage tracing back to 1970s acts Return To Forever, the Headhunters, or Weather Report, which Kevin Fellezs (2011) understands as Fusion—provides a rich opportunity for me to confront this emergent “genrefication” process empirically, analyzing the breadth of conceptual musical influences it compromises.  A telling exemplar of this emergent CF genre is Snarky Puppy.  Their “rabid fanbase”, as Chinen (2015) calls it, attends to their musical performances in many different and revealing ways.  Snarky Puppy (along with similar bands) manages to appeal to the pretentiously complex jazz snob, the party-oriented jam band junkie, and the extraordinarily average pop-radio guy all at the same time within the same song (three terms derived from Frith’s three discourses considered in detail below). My research, which includes sociological fieldwork, theoretical analysis, and original composition, analyzes which of these groups’ compositional choices (i.e. harmonic, rhythmic, and melodic ideas) and performance practices (i.e. song choice, conversation with audience, performative energy level, etc.) create an environment where many kinds of listening can occur.


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Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:00am - 10:20am
018 Lipinsky Hall

10:15am

The Sound of Glass: Creating Music ThroughScience
This poster, created by the students of UNCA’s Music Theory Club, demonstrates the process of tuning water glasses to specific pitches, as directed by composer Ēriks Ešenvalds for his choral piece “Stars”. Our display includes detailed procedural guidelines for tuning glasses, information about the nature of the overtone series and its relationship to tuned glasses, the physical properties of glass as they relate to its resonant capacity, historical background regarding the application of the overtone series in music theory, quantitative data comparing volume of water in a glass to its fundamental resonant frequency, as well as qualitative data discussing the practicality of performing with tuned glasses. These data were obtained during the preparation for our performance.
In presenting this poster we seek to examine the meaningful connections that exist between music making and the physical sciences. Inquiry into the nature of sound as a physical phenomenon affords insight into how it can be organized by human agents into expressive artifacts of culture. Using tuned water glasses as a case study, our poster demonstrates the existence of an oft-ignored dualism at the heart of sound-art: the parallel nature of music as artistic expression and as physical manipulation of the natural world.


Tuesday December 6, 2016 10:15am - 12:00pm
Wilma Sherrill Center - Concourse